Evaluation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay to confirm surface disinfection of biological indicators with vaporised hydrogen peroxide (VHP)

Erica M. Colbert, Shawn G. Gibbs, Kendra K Schmid, Robin High, John-Martin J Lowe, Oleg Chaika, Philip W. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Decontamination of hospital isolation rooms can be conducted using vaporised hydrogen peroxide (VHP). A more rapid biological indicator, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, could allow rooms to be reoccupied sooner and reduce down time. Aim This study examined the ATP bioluminescence assay as a way to evaluate biological indicators to confirm decontamination following the use of VHP. Methods Response to VHP exposure was evaluated using microbial inactivation by standard culture methods and by the ATP bioluminescence assay. Range finding determined the approximate exposure time necessary to achieve partial and complete inactivation of the organisms. Two-hundred-and-fifty parts per million of VHP was delivered to the chamber during the exposure cycle. Fifty cm2 stainless steel coupons were inoculated with 50μL of organism suspensions containing >109 colony forming units (CFU) of the following: Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The standard manufactured biological indicator stainless steel discs containing concentrations of 104, 105 and 106 CFU/surface of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were also evaluated. Findings Multiple log-reductions were shown utilising standard culture methods for each organism, but the ATP bioluminescence assay did not show a corresponding log-reduction. Conclusion The ATP bioluminescence assay was not considered an effective alternate to standard culture-based methodologies for the confirmation of VHP decontamination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberHI14022
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalHealthcare Infection
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Disinfection
Hydrogen Peroxide
Adenosine Triphosphate
Decontamination
Stainless Steel
Isolation Hospitals
Stem Cells
Microbial Viability
Geobacillus stearothermophilus
Acinetobacter baumannii
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Spores
Suspensions

Keywords

  • decontamination
  • hospital-acquired infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Evaluation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay to confirm surface disinfection of biological indicators with vaporised hydrogen peroxide (VHP). / Colbert, Erica M.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Schmid, Kendra K; High, Robin; Lowe, John-Martin J; Chaika, Oleg; Smith, Philip W.

In: Healthcare Infection, Vol. 20, No. 1, HI14022, 2015, p. 16-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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