Evaluation and management of atrial fibrillation in the emergency department

H. Li, Arthur R Easley Jr, W. Barrington, John Robert Windle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AF is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. Recognition and appropriate management of AF is important to optimize care of concurrent medical problems and prevent long-term consequences. DC cardioversion under sedation should be performed in patients with pulmonary edema, angina, or hypotension. Ventricular rate control is the first choice in stable patients with rapid ventricular rate. Anticoagulation should be considered in all patients with AF duration <48 hours, except for those under 65 years old and having no other risk factors of stroke. Recent data imply that early attempts at cardioversion may increase success rates and decrease AF recurrence rates. Thus, transesophageal echocardiogram-guided early cardioversion may become more widely used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-403
Number of pages15
JournalEmergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

Electric Countershock
Atrial Fibrillation
Hospital Emergency Service
Pulmonary Edema
Hypotension
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Stroke
Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Evaluation and management of atrial fibrillation in the emergency department. / Li, H.; Easley Jr, Arthur R; Barrington, W.; Windle, John Robert.

In: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 389-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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