Evaluating the use of multiteam systems to manage the complexity of inpatient falls in rural hospitals

Katherine J. Jones, Anne M Skinner, Dawn Venema, John Crowe, Robin High, Victoria L Kennel, Joseph A Allen, Roni Reiter-Palmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the implementation and outcomes of evidence-based fall-risk-reduction processes when those processes are implemented using a multiteam system (MTS) structure. Data Sources/Study Setting: Fall-risk-reduction process and outcome measures from 16 small rural hospitals participating in a research demonstration and dissemination study from August 2012 to July 2014. Previously, these hospitals lacked a fall-event reporting system to drive improvement. Study Design: A one-group pretest-posttest embedded in a participatory research framework. We required hospitals to implement MTSs, which we supported by conducting education, developing an online toolkit, and establishing a fall-event reporting system. Data Collection: Hospitals used gap analyses to assess the presence of fall-risk-reduction processes at study beginning and their frequency and effectiveness at study end; they reported fall-event data throughout the study. Principal Findings: The extent to which hospitals implemented 21 processes to coordinate the fall-risk-reduction program and trained staff specifically about the program predicted unassisted and injurious fall rates during the end-of-study period (January 2014-July 2014). Bedside fall-risk-reduction processes were not significant predictors of these outcomes. Conclusions: Multiteam systems that effectively coordinate fall-risk-reduction processes may improve the capacity of hospitals to manage the complex patient, environmental, and system factors that result in falls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)994-1006
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Rural Hospitals
Risk Reduction Behavior
Inpatients
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Information Storage and Retrieval
Research
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education

Keywords

  • falls
  • implementation evaluation
  • multiteam systems
  • patient safety
  • quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Evaluating the use of multiteam systems to manage the complexity of inpatient falls in rural hospitals. / Jones, Katherine J.; Skinner, Anne M; Venema, Dawn; Crowe, John; High, Robin; Kennel, Victoria L; Allen, Joseph A; Reiter-Palmon, Roni.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 54, No. 5, 01.10.2019, p. 994-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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