Evaluating the impact of health promotion programs: Using the RE-AIM framework to form summary measures for decision making involving complex issues

Russell E. Glasgow, Lisa M. Klesges, David A. Dzewaltowski, Paul A. Estabrooks, Thomas M. Vogt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

289 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current public health and medical evidence rely heavily on efficacy information to make decisions regarding intervention impact. This evidence base could be enhanced by research studies that evaluate and report multiple indicators of internal and external validity such as Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) as well as their combined impact. However, indices that summarize the combined impact of, and complex interactions among, intervention outcome dimensions are not currently available. We propose and discuss a series of composite metrics that combine two or more RE-AIM dimensions, and can be used to estimate overall intervention impact. Although speculative and, at this point, there have been limited empirical data on these metrics, they extend current methods and are offered to yield more integrated composite outcomes relevant to public health. Such approaches offer potential to help identify interventions most likely to meaningfully impact population health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-694
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

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Health Promotion
health promotion
Decision Making
Public Health
Maintenance
decision making
public health
Health
Research
Population
evidence
interaction
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Evaluating the impact of health promotion programs : Using the RE-AIM framework to form summary measures for decision making involving complex issues. / Glasgow, Russell E.; Klesges, Lisa M.; Dzewaltowski, David A.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Vogt, Thomas M.

In: Health Education Research, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.10.2006, p. 688-694.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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