Ethnic differences in expectations for aging among older adults

Catherine A. Sarkisian, Sara M. Shunkwiler, Iris Aguilar, Alison A. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Age-expectations of 611 non-Latino white, African-American, and Latino seniors recruited at 14 community-based senior centers in the greater Los Angeles region were compared. Participants completed the Expectations Regarding Aging (ERA-38) Survey, a self-administered instrument with previously demonstrated reliability and validity for measuring age-expectations. Analysis of variance was used to compare unadjusted differences between scores across ethnic groups. To examine whether observed differences persisted after adjusting for health and sociodemographic characteristics, a series of linear regression models was constructed, with the dependent variable being total ERA-38 score and the primary independent variables being African-American and Latino ethnicity (reference group=white), adjusting for age, sex, physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQoL), medical comorbidity, activity of daily living (ADL) impairments, depression, and education. Latinos had significantly lower overall age-expectations than non-Latino whites or African Americans after adjusting for age and sex (parameter estimate=-3.4, P=.01); this difference persisted after adjusting for health variables including medical comorbidity, HRQoL, ADL impairments, and depression. After adjusting for education, being Latino was no longer significantly associated with lower age-expectations (parameter estimate=-1.9, P=.18). Being African American was not significantly associated with age-expectations in any of the adjusted models. Younger age and better HRQoL were associated with higher age-expectations in all models. In conclusion, of these 611 older adults recruited at senior centers in the greater Los Angeles region, Latinos had significantly lower age-expectations than non-Latino whites and African Americans, even after adjusting for health characteristics, but differences in educational levels explained this difference.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1277-1282
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Senior Centers
Los Angeles
Quality of Life
Activities of Daily Living
Comorbidity
Linear Models
Health
Depression
Education
Ethnic Groups
Reproducibility of Results
Analysis of Variance
Mental Health

Keywords

  • African American
  • Aged
  • Ageism
  • Attitude toward health
  • Hispanic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Ethnic differences in expectations for aging among older adults. / Sarkisian, Catherine A.; Shunkwiler, Sara M.; Aguilar, Iris; Moore, Alison A.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 54, No. 8, 01.08.2006, p. 1277-1282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sarkisian, Catherine A. ; Shunkwiler, Sara M. ; Aguilar, Iris ; Moore, Alison A. / Ethnic differences in expectations for aging among older adults. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2006 ; Vol. 54, No. 8. pp. 1277-1282.
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