Estimating the state-level supply of cancer care providers: Preparing to meet workforce needs in the wake of health care reform

Aastha N. Chandak, Fausto R. Loberiza, Marlene Deras, James Olen Armitage, Julie Marie Vose, Jim P. Stimpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study describes the supply of cancer care providers - physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), and physician assistants (PAs) - in Nebraska and analyzes changes in the supply over a 5-year period. Method: We used workforce survey data for the years 2008 to 2012 from the Health Professions Tracking Service to analyze the cancer care workforce supply in the state of Nebraska. The supply of cancer care providers was analyzed over the 5-year period on the basis of age, sex, specialty, and practice location; distribution of work hours for cancer care physicians was analyzed for 2012. Results: From 2008 to 2012, there was a 3.3% increase in the number of cancer care physicians. Majority of the cancer care physicians (82.5%), NPs (81.1%), and PAs (80%) reported working in urban counties, whereas approximately half of the state's population resides in rural counties (47%). Compared with the national distribution, Nebraska has a lower proportion of medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and pediatric hematologists/oncologists. The gap between the number of cancer care physicians age ≥ 64 years and the number younger than 40 years is slowly closing in Nebraska, with an increase in those age ≥ 64 years. Conclusion: Increasing cancer incidence and improved access to cancer care through the Affordable Care Act could increase demand for cancer care workers. Policymakers and legislators should consider a range of policies based on the best available data on the supply of cancer care providers and the demand for cancer care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-37
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of oncology practice
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Health Care Reform
Neoplasms
Physicians
Physician Assistants
Nurse Practitioners
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Health Occupations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Estimating the state-level supply of cancer care providers : Preparing to meet workforce needs in the wake of health care reform. / Chandak, Aastha N.; Loberiza, Fausto R.; Deras, Marlene; Armitage, James Olen; Vose, Julie Marie; Stimpson, Jim P.

In: Journal of oncology practice, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 32-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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