Escalating risk and the moderating effect of resistance to peer influence on the P200 and feedback-related negativity

John Kiat, Elizabeth Straley, Jacob E. Cheadle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Young people frequently socialize together in contexts that encourage risky decision making, pointing to a need for research into how susceptibility to peer influence is related to individual differences in the neural processing of decisions during sequentially escalating risk. We applied a novel analytic approach to analyze EEG activity from college-going students while they completed the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), a well-established risk-taking propensity assessment. By modeling outcome-processing-related changes in the P200 and feedback-related negativity (FRN) sequentially within each BART trial as a function of pump order as an index of increasing risk, our results suggest that analyzing the BART in a progressive fashion may provide valuable new insights into the temporal neurophysiological dynamics of risk taking. Our results showed that a P200, localized to the left caudate nucleus, and an FRN, localized to the left dACC, were positively correlated with the level of risk taking and reward. Furthermore, consistent with our hypotheses, the rate of change in the FRN was higher among college students with greater self-reported resistance to peer influence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-386
Number of pages10
JournalSocial cognitive and affective neuroscience
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
Students
Caudate Nucleus
Reward
Individuality
Electroencephalography
Decision Making
Peer Influence
Research

Keywords

  • Balloon Analogue Risk Task
  • EEG
  • Peer influence
  • Risk taking
  • feedback-related negativity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Escalating risk and the moderating effect of resistance to peer influence on the P200 and feedback-related negativity. / Kiat, John; Straley, Elizabeth; Cheadle, Jacob E.

In: Social cognitive and affective neuroscience, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 377-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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