Ergolytic/ergogenic effects of creatine on aerobic power

A. E. Smith, D. H. Fukuda, E. D. Ryan, K. L. Kendall, J. T. Cramer, Jeff Stout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the effects of creatine (Cr) loading and sex differences on aerobic running performance. 27 men (mean±SD; age: 22.2±3.1 years, ht: 179.5±8.7cm, wt: 78.0±9.8kg) and 28 women (age: 21.2±2.1 years, ht: 166.0±5.8cm, wt: 63.4±8.9kg) were randomly assigned to either creatine (Cr, di-creatine citrate; n=27) or a placebo (PL; n=28) group, ingesting 1 packet 4 times daily (total of 20g/day) for 5 days. Aerobic power (maximal oxygen consumption: VO2max) was assessed before and after supplementation using open circuit spirometry (Parvo-Medics) during graded exercise tests on a treadmill. 4 high-speed runs to exhaustion were conducted at 110, 105, 100, and 90% of peak velocity to determine critical velocity (CV). Distances achieved were plotted over times-to-exhaustion and linear regression was used to determine the slopes (critical velocity, CV) assessing aerobic performance. The results indicated that Cr loading did not positively or negatively influence VO2max, CV, time to exhaustion or body mass (p>0.05). These results suggest Cr supplementation may be used in aerobic running activities without detriments to performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)975-981
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume32
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

Performance-Enhancing Substances
Creatine
Spirometry
Exercise Test
Oxygen Consumption
Citric Acid
Sex Characteristics
Linear Models
Placebos

Keywords

  • anaerobic
  • body-weight activity
  • gender
  • supplement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Ergolytic/ergogenic effects of creatine on aerobic power. / Smith, A. E.; Fukuda, D. H.; Ryan, E. D.; Kendall, K. L.; Cramer, J. T.; Stout, Jeff.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 32, No. 12, 01.12.2011, p. 975-981.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, AE, Fukuda, DH, Ryan, ED, Kendall, KL, Cramer, JT & Stout, J 2011, 'Ergolytic/ergogenic effects of creatine on aerobic power', International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 32, no. 12, pp. 975-981. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0031-1283179
Smith, A. E. ; Fukuda, D. H. ; Ryan, E. D. ; Kendall, K. L. ; Cramer, J. T. ; Stout, Jeff. / Ergolytic/ergogenic effects of creatine on aerobic power. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 12. pp. 975-981.
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