Envisioning a future governance and funding system for undergraduate and graduate medical education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Funding for graduate medical education (GME) and undergraduate medical education (UME) in the United States is being debated and challenged at the national and state levels as policy makers and educators question whether the multibillion dollar investment in medical education is succeeding in meeting the nation's health care needs. To address these concerns, the authors propose a novel all-payer system for GME and UME funding that equitably distributes medical education costs among all stakeholders, including those who benefit most from medical education. Through a "Medical Education Workforce (MEW) trust fund," indirect and direct GME dollars would be replaced with a funds-flow mechanism using fees paid for services by all payers (Medicaid, Medicare, private insurers, others) while providing direct compensation to physicians and institutions that actively engage medical learners in providing clinical care. The accountability of those receiving MEW funds would be improved by linking their funding levels to their ability to meet predetermined institutional, program, faculty, and learner benchmarks. Additionally, the MEW fund would cover learners' UME tuition, potentially eliminating their UME debt, in return for their provision of health care services (after completing GME training) in an underserved area or specialty. This proposed model attempts to increase transparency and enhance accountability in medical education by linking funding to the development of a physician workforce that is able to excel in the evolving health delivery system. Achieving this vision requires physician educators, leaders of academic health centers, policy makers, insurers, and patients to muster the courage to embrace transformational change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1224-1230
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume90
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Undergraduate Medical Education
Graduate Medical Education
Medical Education
funding
graduate
governance
Financial Management
education
Insurance Carriers
Social Responsibility
Administrative Personnel
Physicians
Delivery of Health Care
Benchmarking
Fee-for-Service Plans
Aptitude
Medicaid
Medicare
Health Policy
physician

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Envisioning a future governance and funding system for undergraduate and graduate medical education. / Gold, Jeffrey P; Stimpson, Jim P.; Caverzagie, Kelly J.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 90, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1224-1230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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