Energy transmittance predicts conductive hearing loss in older children and adults

Douglas H Keefe, Jeffrey L. Simmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The test performance of a wideband acoustic transfer function (ATF) test and 226-Hz tympanometry was assessed in predicting the presence of conductive hearing loss, based on an air-bone gap of 20 dB or more. Two ATF tests were designed using an improved calibration method over a frequency range (0.25-8 kHz): an ambient-pressure test and a tympanometric test using an excess static pressure in the ear canal. Wideband responses were objectively classified using moment analyses of energy transmittance, which was a more appropriate test variable than energy reflectance. Subjects included adults and children of age 10 years and up, with 42 normal-functioning ears and 18 ears with a conductive hearing loss. Predictors were based on the magnitudes of the moment deviations from the 10th to 90th percentiles of the normal group. Comparing tests at a fixed specificity of 0.90, the sensitivities were 0.28 for peak-compensated static acoustic admittance at 226 Hz, 0.72 for ambient-pressure ATF, and 0.94 for pressurized ATF. Pressurized ATF was accurate at predicting conductive hearing loss with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.95. Ambient-pressure ATF may have sufficient accuracy to use in some hearing-screening applications, whereas pressurized ATF has additional accuracy that may be appropriate for hearing-diagnostic applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3217-3238
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume114
Issue number6 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003

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auditory defects
transmittance
transfer functions
acoustics
ear
energy
hearing
broadband
moments
canals
static pressure
Energy
Hearing Impairment
Acoustics
performance tests
electrical impedance
bones
screening
receivers
frequency ranges

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Energy transmittance predicts conductive hearing loss in older children and adults. / Keefe, Douglas H; Simmons, Jeffrey L.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 114, No. 6 I, 01.12.2003, p. 3217-3238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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