Empathic responsiveness in amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex in youths with psychopathic traits

Abigail A. Marsh, Elizabeth C. Finger, Katherine A. Fowler, Christopher J. Adalio, Ilana T.N. Jurkowitz, Julia C. Schechter, Daniel S. Pine, Jean Decety, Robert James Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Psychopathic traits are associated with increases in antisocial behaviors such as aggression and are characterized by reduced empathy for others' distress. This suggests that psychopathic traits may also impair empathic pain sensitivity. However, whether psychopathic traits affect responses to the pain of others versus the self has not been previously assessed. Method We used whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural activation in 14 adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder and psychopathic traits, as well as 21 healthy controls matched on age, gender, and intelligence. Activation in structures associated with empathic pain perception was assessed as adolescents viewed photographs of pain-inducing injuries. Adolescents imagined either that the body in each photograph was their own or that it belonged to another person. Behavioral and neuroimaging data were analyzed using random-effects analysis of variance. Results Youths with psychopathic traits showed reduced activity within regions associated with empathic pain as the depicted pain increased. These regions included rostral anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum (putamen), and amygdala. Reductions in amygdala activity particularly occurred when the injury was perceived as occurring to another. Empathic pain responses within both amygdala and rostral anterior cingulate cortex were negatively correlated with the severity of psychopathic traits as indexed by PCL:YV scores. Conclusions Youths with psychopathic traits show less responsiveness in regions implicated in the affective response to another's pain as the perceived intensity of this pain increases. Moreover, this reduced responsiveness appears to predict symptom severity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)900-910
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

Fingerprint

Gyrus Cinguli
Amygdala
Pain
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Conduct Disorder
Pain Perception
Ego
Putamen
Wounds and Injuries
Aggression
Intelligence
Neuroimaging
Analysis of Variance
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

Keywords

  • Psychopathy
  • adolescents
  • amygdala
  • conduct disorder
  • empathy
  • pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Empathic responsiveness in amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex in youths with psychopathic traits. / Marsh, Abigail A.; Finger, Elizabeth C.; Fowler, Katherine A.; Adalio, Christopher J.; Jurkowitz, Ilana T.N.; Schechter, Julia C.; Pine, Daniel S.; Decety, Jean; Blair, Robert James.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 54, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 900-910.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marsh, Abigail A. ; Finger, Elizabeth C. ; Fowler, Katherine A. ; Adalio, Christopher J. ; Jurkowitz, Ilana T.N. ; Schechter, Julia C. ; Pine, Daniel S. ; Decety, Jean ; Blair, Robert James. / Empathic responsiveness in amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex in youths with psychopathic traits. In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines. 2013 ; Vol. 54, No. 8. pp. 900-910.
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