Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by rate of application of cattle manure

B. L. Woodbury, J. E. Gilley, D. B. Parker, D. B. Marx, R. A. Eigenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable nutrient source for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) following land application may pose a potential off-site odor concern. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of land application method, N application rate, soil moisture content, and time since manure application on VOC emissions. Manure from cattle fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grains was applied to a cropland area at rates required to meet the 0.5, 1, or 2 year N requirement for corn. Land application methods included surface-applying manure (i.e., no tillage) or incorporating manure using disk tillage. The effect of soil moisture content on VOC emissions was determined by adding water to the experimental plots approximately 24 h after manure application. Volatile sulfur compounds (i.e., dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide), isovaleric acid, and butyric acid contributed 43.4%, 14.0%, and 13.9%, respectively, of the total measured odor activity value (OAV). Emissions of each of the principal VOC odor compounds were reduced by manure incorporation. In general, no significant differences in VOC measurements of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and aromatic compounds were found among varying manure application rates. However, an increase in emissions of volatile sulfur compounds resulted from increased manure application. Measurements of VFAs and aromatic compounds usually decreased and sulfide emissions increased following the application of water. Application method, N application rate, soil moisture content, and time since application may all influence VOC emissions following land application of cattle manure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-895
Number of pages11
JournalTransactions of the ASABE
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Volatile Organic Compounds
Manure
Manures
volatile organic compounds
cattle manure
Volatile organic compounds
application rate
animal manures
volatile organic compound
cattle
manure
land application
application methods
Soil moisture
soil water content
Odors
odor
Volatile fatty acids
Sulfur Compounds
volatile fatty acids

Keywords

  • Air contaminants
  • Air quality
  • Environmental management
  • Land application
  • Manure management
  • Odor control
  • Odor emission
  • Odor evaluation
  • VOC
  • Volatile fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Food Science
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Woodbury, B. L., Gilley, J. E., Parker, D. B., Marx, D. B., & Eigenberg, R. A. (2016). Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by rate of application of cattle manure. Transactions of the ASABE, 59(3), 885-895. https://doi.org/10.13031/trans.59.11374

Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by rate of application of cattle manure. / Woodbury, B. L.; Gilley, J. E.; Parker, D. B.; Marx, D. B.; Eigenberg, R. A.

In: Transactions of the ASABE, Vol. 59, No. 3, 01.01.2016, p. 885-895.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woodbury, BL, Gilley, JE, Parker, DB, Marx, DB & Eigenberg, RA 2016, 'Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by rate of application of cattle manure', Transactions of the ASABE, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 885-895. https://doi.org/10.13031/trans.59.11374
Woodbury, B. L. ; Gilley, J. E. ; Parker, D. B. ; Marx, D. B. ; Eigenberg, R. A. / Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by rate of application of cattle manure. In: Transactions of the ASABE. 2016 ; Vol. 59, No. 3. pp. 885-895.
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