Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure

Bryan L. Woodbury, John E. Gilley, David B. Parker, David B. Marx, Daniel N. Miller, Roger A. Eigenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable source of nutrients for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after land application may pose an odor nuisance to downwind populations. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of land application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since manure application on VOC emissions. Manure was collected from feedlot pens where cattle were fed diets containing 0, 10, or 30% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). Land application methods included surface-applying manure (i.e., no-tillage) or incorporating manure using disk tillage. The effects of soil moisture content on VOC emissions was determined by adding water to each of the plots approximately 24 h after manure application. Isovaleric acid, butyric acid, and 4-methylphenol contributed 28.9, 18.0, and 17.7%, respectively, of the total measured odor activity values. In general, the largest emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were measured during the initial collection periods on the no-tillage plots under dry soil moisture conditions. Emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were reduced after water additions because these compounds were stored in the soil-water matrix rather than released into the atmosphere. In contrast, sulfide emissions generally increased with the addition of the water, especially on the plots containing manure from the 30% WDGS diet. Sulfur content of manure increases with higher percentages of WDGS feed stock. Application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since application should be considered when estimating VOC emissions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1218
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Environmental Quality
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Manures
Volatile organic compounds
volatile organic compound
cattle
manure
Soil moisture
Nutrition
soil moisture
diet
Volatile fatty acids
moisture content
Moisture
Odors
zero tillage
Water
fatty acid
Beef
Butyric acid
land
acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Woodbury, B. L., Gilley, J. E., Parker, D. B., Marx, D. B., Miller, D. N., & Eigenberg, R. A. (2014). Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure. Journal of Environmental Quality, 43(4), 1207-1218. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2013.05.0185

Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure. / Woodbury, Bryan L.; Gilley, John E.; Parker, David B.; Marx, David B.; Miller, Daniel N.; Eigenberg, Roger A.

In: Journal of Environmental Quality, Vol. 43, No. 4, 2014, p. 1207-1218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woodbury, BL, Gilley, JE, Parker, DB, Marx, DB, Miller, DN & Eigenberg, RA 2014, 'Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure', Journal of Environmental Quality, vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 1207-1218. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2013.05.0185
Woodbury, Bryan L. ; Gilley, John E. ; Parker, David B. ; Marx, David B. ; Miller, Daniel N. ; Eigenberg, Roger A. / Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure. In: Journal of Environmental Quality. 2014 ; Vol. 43, No. 4. pp. 1207-1218.
@article{673d2bfdfabc49879221cdfe63f3527b,
title = "Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure",
abstract = "Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable source of nutrients for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after land application may pose an odor nuisance to downwind populations. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of land application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since manure application on VOC emissions. Manure was collected from feedlot pens where cattle were fed diets containing 0, 10, or 30{\%} wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). Land application methods included surface-applying manure (i.e., no-tillage) or incorporating manure using disk tillage. The effects of soil moisture content on VOC emissions was determined by adding water to each of the plots approximately 24 h after manure application. Isovaleric acid, butyric acid, and 4-methylphenol contributed 28.9, 18.0, and 17.7{\%}, respectively, of the total measured odor activity values. In general, the largest emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were measured during the initial collection periods on the no-tillage plots under dry soil moisture conditions. Emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were reduced after water additions because these compounds were stored in the soil-water matrix rather than released into the atmosphere. In contrast, sulfide emissions generally increased with the addition of the water, especially on the plots containing manure from the 30{\%} WDGS diet. Sulfur content of manure increases with higher percentages of WDGS feed stock. Application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since application should be considered when estimating VOC emissions.",
author = "Woodbury, {Bryan L.} and Gilley, {John E.} and Parker, {David B.} and Marx, {David B.} and Miller, {Daniel N.} and Eigenberg, {Roger A.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.2134/jeq2013.05.0185",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "1207--1218",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Quality",
issn = "0047-2425",
publisher = "ASA/CSSA/SSSA",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure

AU - Woodbury, Bryan L.

AU - Gilley, John E.

AU - Parker, David B.

AU - Marx, David B.

AU - Miller, Daniel N.

AU - Eigenberg, Roger A.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable source of nutrients for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after land application may pose an odor nuisance to downwind populations. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of land application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since manure application on VOC emissions. Manure was collected from feedlot pens where cattle were fed diets containing 0, 10, or 30% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). Land application methods included surface-applying manure (i.e., no-tillage) or incorporating manure using disk tillage. The effects of soil moisture content on VOC emissions was determined by adding water to each of the plots approximately 24 h after manure application. Isovaleric acid, butyric acid, and 4-methylphenol contributed 28.9, 18.0, and 17.7%, respectively, of the total measured odor activity values. In general, the largest emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were measured during the initial collection periods on the no-tillage plots under dry soil moisture conditions. Emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were reduced after water additions because these compounds were stored in the soil-water matrix rather than released into the atmosphere. In contrast, sulfide emissions generally increased with the addition of the water, especially on the plots containing manure from the 30% WDGS diet. Sulfur content of manure increases with higher percentages of WDGS feed stock. Application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since application should be considered when estimating VOC emissions.

AB - Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable source of nutrients for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after land application may pose an odor nuisance to downwind populations. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of land application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since manure application on VOC emissions. Manure was collected from feedlot pens where cattle were fed diets containing 0, 10, or 30% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). Land application methods included surface-applying manure (i.e., no-tillage) or incorporating manure using disk tillage. The effects of soil moisture content on VOC emissions was determined by adding water to each of the plots approximately 24 h after manure application. Isovaleric acid, butyric acid, and 4-methylphenol contributed 28.9, 18.0, and 17.7%, respectively, of the total measured odor activity values. In general, the largest emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were measured during the initial collection periods on the no-tillage plots under dry soil moisture conditions. Emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were reduced after water additions because these compounds were stored in the soil-water matrix rather than released into the atmosphere. In contrast, sulfide emissions generally increased with the addition of the water, especially on the plots containing manure from the 30% WDGS diet. Sulfur content of manure increases with higher percentages of WDGS feed stock. Application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since application should be considered when estimating VOC emissions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84904684120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84904684120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2134/jeq2013.05.0185

DO - 10.2134/jeq2013.05.0185

M3 - Article

C2 - 25603069

AN - SCOPUS:84904684120

VL - 43

SP - 1207

EP - 1218

JO - Journal of Environmental Quality

JF - Journal of Environmental Quality

SN - 0047-2425

IS - 4

ER -