Efficacy of postoperative follow-up telephone calls for patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy

Kristina W. Rosbe, Dwight Jones, Scharukh Jalisi, Mary Ann Bray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of postoperative follow-up telephone calls among pediatric patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy. Design: Prospective study with a follow-up questionnaire administered by telephone. Setting: Tertiary-care children's hospital. Patients: One hundred thirty-four children between the ages of 4 and 18 years who underwent adenotonsillectomy between December 1997 and June 1998 and did not have associated cardiac, pulmonary, bleeding, or syndromic disorders were included in this pilot study. Intervention: Parents of these patients were given the opportunity to participate in our study, and it was emphasized that, at any time during the child's care, if the parent desired a follow-up visit or if the child experienced any symptoms that caused concern, the parent should contact the clinic for a follow-up appointment. A telephone call was placed 3 to 4 weeks postoperavively by an otolaryngology nurse, and a questionnaire was filled out using the parents' responses. Main Outcome Measures: The incidence rates of voice change, velopharyngeal insufficiency, bleeding, constipation, dehydration, and pain were measured. Parent satisfaction, patient safety, and cost-benefit were also evaluated. Results: Less than 5% of patients reported temporary velopharyngeal insufficiency, while 2% of patients required operative intervention for bleeding episodes and 1% required hospitalization. Voice change, reported by approximately 70% of all patients, was the most common complaint, but it resolved in all instances. Pain was reported to be most severe on postoperative day 1. Ninety-six percent of parents requested no further follow-up visit. Conclusions: Our pilot study revealed that a follow-up telephone call is a safe and cost-effective method of postoperative management for pediatric patients who have undergone adenotonsillectomy and that this method of follow-up is also desirable to parents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-721
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume126
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000

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Telephone
Parents
Velopharyngeal Insufficiency
Hemorrhage
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Pediatrics
Pain
Otolaryngology
Tertiary Healthcare
Constipation
Patient Safety
Child Care
Dehydration
Appointments and Schedules
Hospitalization
Nurses
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Costs and Cost Analysis
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Efficacy of postoperative follow-up telephone calls for patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy. / Rosbe, Kristina W.; Jones, Dwight; Jalisi, Scharukh; Bray, Mary Ann.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 126, No. 6, 06.2000, p. 718-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of postoperative follow-up telephone calls among pediatric patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy. Design: Prospective study with a follow-up questionnaire administered by telephone. Setting: Tertiary-care children's hospital. Patients: One hundred thirty-four children between the ages of 4 and 18 years who underwent adenotonsillectomy between December 1997 and June 1998 and did not have associated cardiac, pulmonary, bleeding, or syndromic disorders were included in this pilot study. Intervention: Parents of these patients were given the opportunity to participate in our study, and it was emphasized that, at any time during the child's care, if the parent desired a follow-up visit or if the child experienced any symptoms that caused concern, the parent should contact the clinic for a follow-up appointment. A telephone call was placed 3 to 4 weeks postoperavively by an otolaryngology nurse, and a questionnaire was filled out using the parents' responses. Main Outcome Measures: The incidence rates of voice change, velopharyngeal insufficiency, bleeding, constipation, dehydration, and pain were measured. Parent satisfaction, patient safety, and cost-benefit were also evaluated. Results: Less than 5{\%} of patients reported temporary velopharyngeal insufficiency, while 2{\%} of patients required operative intervention for bleeding episodes and 1{\%} required hospitalization. Voice change, reported by approximately 70{\%} of all patients, was the most common complaint, but it resolved in all instances. Pain was reported to be most severe on postoperative day 1. Ninety-six percent of parents requested no further follow-up visit. Conclusions: Our pilot study revealed that a follow-up telephone call is a safe and cost-effective method of postoperative management for pediatric patients who have undergone adenotonsillectomy and that this method of follow-up is also desirable to parents.",
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