Effects of topical administration of an aldose reductase inhibitor on cataract formation in dogs fed a diet high in galactose

Peter F Kador, Daniel Betts, Milton Wyman, Karen Blessing, James Randazzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine effects of a topical formulation of an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) on the development of sugar cataracts in dogs fed a diet high in galactose. Animals - Ten 6-month old Beagles. Procedures - Dogs were fed a diet containing 30% galactose, and after 16 weeks, 6 dogs were treated topically with a proprietary ARI formulation and 4 dogs were treated with a placebo. Cataract formation was monitored by means of slit-lamp biomicroscopy and fundus photography. Dogs were euthanized after 10 weeks of treatment, and lenses were evaluated for degree of opacity, myo-inositol and galactitol concentrations, and concentration of the ARI. Results - All dogs developed bilateral cortical opacities dense enough to result in a decrease in the tapetal reflex after being fed the galactose-containing diet for 16 weeks. Administration of the ARI arrested further development of cataract formation. In contrast, cataracts in the vehicle-treated dogs progressed over the 10-week period to the mature stage. Evaluation of the isolated lenses after 26 weeks of galactose feeding indicated that lenses from treated dogs were significantly less optically dense than lenses from control dogs. Lenticular myo-inositol concentration was significantly higher in the treated than in the control dogs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that topical application of a proprietary ARI formulation may arrest or reverse the development of sugar cataracts in dogs fed a diet high in galactose. This suggests that this ARI formulation may be beneficial in maintaining or improving functional vision in diabetic dogs with early lens opacities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1783-1787
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume67
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 26 2006

Fingerprint

aldehyde reductase
Topical Administration
Aldehyde Reductase
cataract
Galactose
galactose
Cataract
Dogs
Diet
dogs
diet
Lens
Lenses
opacity
Inositol
myo-inositol
Galactitol
galactitol
sugars
photography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effects of topical administration of an aldose reductase inhibitor on cataract formation in dogs fed a diet high in galactose. / Kador, Peter F; Betts, Daniel; Wyman, Milton; Blessing, Karen; Randazzo, James.

In: American journal of veterinary research, Vol. 67, No. 10, 26.10.2006, p. 1783-1787.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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