Effects of the Sunny Days, Healthy Ways curriculum on students in grades 6 to 8

David B. Buller, Kim D. Reynolds, Amy L Yaroch, Gary R. Cutter, Joan M. Hines, Cristy R. Geno, Julie A. Maloy, Melissa Brown, W. Gill Woodall, Joseph Grandpre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are few effective sun-safety education programs for use in secondary schools. Project aims were to create a sun-safety curriculum for grades 6 to 8, and to test whether exposure to the curriculum would increase children's sun-protection behavior. Design: A pair-matched, group-randomized, pre-post test, controlled trial was performed with middle schools as the unit of randomization. Teachers implemented the six-unit sun-safety curriculum in 2001-2003, and analyses were performed in 2003-2004. Setting/Participants: A total of 2038 children from 30 middle schools in Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported sun-protection behavior using frequency ratings and diary. Results: Compared to control schools, children receiving the curriculum reported more frequent sun protection (p=0.0035), and a greater proportion wore long-sleeved shirts during recess (p<0.0001) and applied sunscreen (p<0.0001). Exposure to the curriculum improved knowledge (p<0.0001), decreased perceived barriers to using sunscreen (p=0.0046), enhanced self-efficacy expectations (p=0.0577) about sun safety, and reduced favorable attitudes toward sun tanning (p=0.0026 to <0.0001). In intent-to-treat analyses, the treatment effect was eliminated only under the most conservative assumptions about dropouts. Conclusions: Educational approaches to sun safety in middle school may be effective for improving children's sun safety. Potential trial limitations include measuring short-term outcomes, focusing on young adolescents, using active parental consent, and testing in the American Southwest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-22
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

Fingerprint

Solar System
Curriculum
Students
Safety
Sunscreening Agents
Parental Consent
Tanning
Self Efficacy
Random Allocation
Research Design
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Buller, D. B., Reynolds, K. D., Yaroch, A. L., Cutter, G. R., Hines, J. M., Geno, C. R., ... Grandpre, J. (2006). Effects of the Sunny Days, Healthy Ways curriculum on students in grades 6 to 8. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 30(1), 13-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2005.08.046

Effects of the Sunny Days, Healthy Ways curriculum on students in grades 6 to 8. / Buller, David B.; Reynolds, Kim D.; Yaroch, Amy L; Cutter, Gary R.; Hines, Joan M.; Geno, Cristy R.; Maloy, Julie A.; Brown, Melissa; Woodall, W. Gill; Grandpre, Joseph.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 13-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buller, DB, Reynolds, KD, Yaroch, AL, Cutter, GR, Hines, JM, Geno, CR, Maloy, JA, Brown, M, Woodall, WG & Grandpre, J 2006, 'Effects of the Sunny Days, Healthy Ways curriculum on students in grades 6 to 8', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 13-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2005.08.046
Buller, David B. ; Reynolds, Kim D. ; Yaroch, Amy L ; Cutter, Gary R. ; Hines, Joan M. ; Geno, Cristy R. ; Maloy, Julie A. ; Brown, Melissa ; Woodall, W. Gill ; Grandpre, Joseph. / Effects of the Sunny Days, Healthy Ways curriculum on students in grades 6 to 8. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 13-22.
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