Effects of teacher preparation and student age on an alcohol and drug education curriculum

Ian M Newman, P. Mohr, B. Badger, T. S. Gillespie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An alcohol/drug education curriculum was tested in twenty-five Nebraska junior high schools involving 1,800 students in grades seven to nine. Using teacher training and student age as independent variables, gains in knowledge and decision-making ability were assessed. There was an interaction between age level and training, with older students taught by fully trained teachers making significantly greater gains in knowledge and decision-making ability than students who were exposed to the curriculum via untrained teachers and those not exposed to the curriculum at all. Teacher training was shown to be a critical variable in curriculum innovation, especially for older students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-36
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of drug education
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

education curriculum
Curriculum
alcohol
Alcohols
Students
drug
Education
teacher
Aptitude
Pharmaceutical Preparations
teacher training
student
curriculum
Decision Making
decision making
ability
school grade
innovation
interaction
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Effects of teacher preparation and student age on an alcohol and drug education curriculum. / Newman, Ian M; Mohr, P.; Badger, B.; Gillespie, T. S.

In: Journal of drug education, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.1984, p. 23-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newman, Ian M ; Mohr, P. ; Badger, B. ; Gillespie, T. S. / Effects of teacher preparation and student age on an alcohol and drug education curriculum. In: Journal of drug education. 1984 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 23-36.
@article{1454aa2a14d845e4b5e914d82f4d83ca,
title = "Effects of teacher preparation and student age on an alcohol and drug education curriculum",
abstract = "An alcohol/drug education curriculum was tested in twenty-five Nebraska junior high schools involving 1,800 students in grades seven to nine. Using teacher training and student age as independent variables, gains in knowledge and decision-making ability were assessed. There was an interaction between age level and training, with older students taught by fully trained teachers making significantly greater gains in knowledge and decision-making ability than students who were exposed to the curriculum via untrained teachers and those not exposed to the curriculum at all. Teacher training was shown to be a critical variable in curriculum innovation, especially for older students.",
author = "Newman, {Ian M} and P. Mohr and B. Badger and Gillespie, {T. S.}",
year = "1984",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2190/AP0A-B6KK-5FVB-C4BW",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "23--36",
journal = "Journal of Drug Education",
issn = "0047-2379",
publisher = "Baywood Publishing Co. Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of teacher preparation and student age on an alcohol and drug education curriculum

AU - Newman, Ian M

AU - Mohr, P.

AU - Badger, B.

AU - Gillespie, T. S.

PY - 1984/1/1

Y1 - 1984/1/1

N2 - An alcohol/drug education curriculum was tested in twenty-five Nebraska junior high schools involving 1,800 students in grades seven to nine. Using teacher training and student age as independent variables, gains in knowledge and decision-making ability were assessed. There was an interaction between age level and training, with older students taught by fully trained teachers making significantly greater gains in knowledge and decision-making ability than students who were exposed to the curriculum via untrained teachers and those not exposed to the curriculum at all. Teacher training was shown to be a critical variable in curriculum innovation, especially for older students.

AB - An alcohol/drug education curriculum was tested in twenty-five Nebraska junior high schools involving 1,800 students in grades seven to nine. Using teacher training and student age as independent variables, gains in knowledge and decision-making ability were assessed. There was an interaction between age level and training, with older students taught by fully trained teachers making significantly greater gains in knowledge and decision-making ability than students who were exposed to the curriculum via untrained teachers and those not exposed to the curriculum at all. Teacher training was shown to be a critical variable in curriculum innovation, especially for older students.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021139087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021139087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2190/AP0A-B6KK-5FVB-C4BW

DO - 10.2190/AP0A-B6KK-5FVB-C4BW

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 23

EP - 36

JO - Journal of Drug Education

JF - Journal of Drug Education

SN - 0047-2379

IS - 1

ER -