Effects of sound-field amplification to increase compliance of students with emotional and behavior disorders

John W. Maag, Jean M. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the efficacy of sound-field amplification (SFA) for improving the speed with which students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) follow teacher directions. We used a multiple baseline design across six students in general education classrooms. Latency data were collected under nonamplified and amplified conditions for two types of directions: (a) task demand and (b) high interest. Results indicated that SFA substantially increased the speed with which students complied with task demand directions but had minimal effect on compliance with high interest directions. Implications for practice and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-393
Number of pages16
JournalBehavioral Disorders
Volume31
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

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behavior disorder
Mental Disorders
Compliance
Students
student
demand
general education
classroom
teacher
Direction compound
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Effects of sound-field amplification to increase compliance of students with emotional and behavior disorders. / Maag, John W.; Anderson, Jean M.

In: Behavioral Disorders, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.08.2006, p. 378-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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