Effects of low-pass filtering on the perception of word-final plurality markers in children and adults with normal hearing

Lori J. Leibold, Hannah Hodson, Ryan W. McCreery, Lauren Calandruccio, Emily Bussa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-pass filtering on the detection of word-final /s/ and /z/ for children and adults with normal hearing. Method: Stimuli were nouns from the University of Western Ontario Plurals Test (Glista & Scollie, 2012), low-pass filtered with 5 different cutoff frequencies: 8000 Hz, 5000 Hz, 4000 Hz, 3000 Hz, and 2000 Hz. Listeners were children (age range = 7-13 years) and adults with normal hearing. The task was a 2-alternative forced-choice task with a picture-pointing response. Results: Performance was worse for lower than for higher low-pass filter cutoff frequencies, but the effect of low-pass filtering was similar for children and adults. Nearly all listeners achieved 100% correct performance when stimuli were low-pass filtered with cutoff frequencies of 8000 Hz or 5000 Hz. Performance remained well above chance even for the most severe filtering condition (2000 Hz). Restricting high-frequency audibility influenced performance for plural items to a greater extent than for singular items. Conclusion: The results indicate that children and adults with normal hearing can use acoustic information below the spectral range of frication noise typically associated with /s/ and /z/ to discriminate between singular and plural forms of nouns in the context of the University of Western Ontario Plurals Test.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-358
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of audiology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Keywords

  • Amplification or hearing aids
  • Assessment
  • Audiology
  • Children
  • Hearing
  • Speech perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing

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