Effects of long-term atomoxetine treatment for young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Christopher J Kratochvil, Timothy E. Wilens, Laurence L. Greenhill, Haitao Gao, Kurt D. Baker, Peter D. Feldman, Douglas L. Gelowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this 13-study (seven double-blind/placebo- controlled, six open-label) meta-analysis is to determine the effectiveness and tolerability of long-term atomoxetine treatment among young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHOD: Data were pooled from 6- and 7-year-olds (N = 272) who met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD, received atomoxetine treatment, and were enrolled in clinical trials of ≥2 years. Of these, 97 subjects reached the 24-month time point, providing data for long-term trend analysis of safety and effectiveness. RESULTS: Effectiveness for most subjects was maintained over long-term treatment, as demonstrated by total scores and total T scores on the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale-IV-Parent Version, investigator administered and scored. During the 2-year period, 25.7% discontinued because of lack of effectiveness, but adverse events were clinically minor and transient, and only 4.0% of children discontinued because of an adverse event. Notable effects on growth were seen during early phases of the study, with attenuation occurring by the 2-year time point. Statistically significant increases in pulse and blood pressure and decreases in cardiac PR interval were seen, but no changes were deemed both statistically significant and clinically meaningful among any vital signs, electrocardiographic measures, or laboratory tests. CONCLUSION: Long-term atomoxetine treatment appears generally well tolerated and effective in the treatment of young children with ADHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)919-927
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

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Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Blood Pressure
Therapeutics
Vital Signs
Double-Blind Method
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Meta-Analysis
Placebos
Research Personnel
Atomoxetine Hydrochloride
Clinical Trials
Safety
Growth

Keywords

  • Atomoxetine
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Pediatric patients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Effects of long-term atomoxetine treatment for young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. / Kratochvil, Christopher J; Wilens, Timothy E.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Gao, Haitao; Baker, Kurt D.; Feldman, Peter D.; Gelowitz, Douglas L.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 45, No. 8, 01.08.2006, p. 919-927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kratochvil, Christopher J ; Wilens, Timothy E. ; Greenhill, Laurence L. ; Gao, Haitao ; Baker, Kurt D. ; Feldman, Peter D. ; Gelowitz, Douglas L. / Effects of long-term atomoxetine treatment for young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2006 ; Vol. 45, No. 8. pp. 919-927.
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