Effects of L-DOPA on aggressive behavior and central monoaminergic activity in the lizard Anolis carolinensis, using a new method for drug delivery

Erik Höglund, Wayne J. Korzan, Michael J. Watt, Gina L. Forster, Tangi R. Summers, Helga Falch Johannessen, Kenneth J. Renner, Cliff H. Summers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dopamine (DA) precursor, l-DOPA (500 μg), was injected into living crickets, which were ingested (one each) by adult male Anolis carolinensis. This method of delivery elevated plasma l-DOPA and DA concentrations by ∼1000-fold. In contrast, plasma epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) were not influenced by l-DOPA treatment, although they were elevated following the consumption of the cricket. Lizards that ingested l-DOPA treated crickets had elevated l-DOPA in all brain regions measured, with DA and/or DOPAC also increased significantly in most brain regions studied. Despite increased DA levels in the striatum and nucleus accumbens as a response to l-DOPA, the treatment had no influence on general motor activity. Central serotonin, NE, and Epi systems were not affected in any brain region by oral l-DOPA treatment. In addition, aggression was inhibited by this dose of l-DOPA, even though there was no effect on serotonergic systems. This is surprising because controlling aggressive behavior is usually considered the province of serotonergic activity. Aggression was measured before and after treatment, and while saline-treated lizards retained the full vigor of aggressive activity, those fed a cricket injected with l-DOPA were only one-third as aggressive after treatment. As l-DOPA treatment did not affect general motor activity, the effect appears to be directly associated with aggression. This is supported by the observation that l-DOPA treatment delayed latency to eyespot darkening, which predicts the latency to aggression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-64
Number of pages12
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume156
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 2005

Fingerprint

Gryllidae
Lizards
Aggression
Dopamine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Epinephrine
Norepinephrine
Brain
Motor Activity
3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic Acid
Nucleus Accumbens
Serotonin

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Dopamine
  • Eyespot
  • Lizard
  • Norepinephrine
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Effects of L-DOPA on aggressive behavior and central monoaminergic activity in the lizard Anolis carolinensis, using a new method for drug delivery. / Höglund, Erik; Korzan, Wayne J.; Watt, Michael J.; Forster, Gina L.; Summers, Tangi R.; Johannessen, Helga Falch; Renner, Kenneth J.; Summers, Cliff H.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 156, No. 1, 06.01.2005, p. 53-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Höglund, Erik ; Korzan, Wayne J. ; Watt, Michael J. ; Forster, Gina L. ; Summers, Tangi R. ; Johannessen, Helga Falch ; Renner, Kenneth J. ; Summers, Cliff H. / Effects of L-DOPA on aggressive behavior and central monoaminergic activity in the lizard Anolis carolinensis, using a new method for drug delivery. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2005 ; Vol. 156, No. 1. pp. 53-64.
@article{56ad202ba0bf4088bedb7e2fae071d42,
title = "Effects of L-DOPA on aggressive behavior and central monoaminergic activity in the lizard Anolis carolinensis, using a new method for drug delivery",
abstract = "The dopamine (DA) precursor, l-DOPA (500 μg), was injected into living crickets, which were ingested (one each) by adult male Anolis carolinensis. This method of delivery elevated plasma l-DOPA and DA concentrations by ∼1000-fold. In contrast, plasma epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) were not influenced by l-DOPA treatment, although they were elevated following the consumption of the cricket. Lizards that ingested l-DOPA treated crickets had elevated l-DOPA in all brain regions measured, with DA and/or DOPAC also increased significantly in most brain regions studied. Despite increased DA levels in the striatum and nucleus accumbens as a response to l-DOPA, the treatment had no influence on general motor activity. Central serotonin, NE, and Epi systems were not affected in any brain region by oral l-DOPA treatment. In addition, aggression was inhibited by this dose of l-DOPA, even though there was no effect on serotonergic systems. This is surprising because controlling aggressive behavior is usually considered the province of serotonergic activity. Aggression was measured before and after treatment, and while saline-treated lizards retained the full vigor of aggressive activity, those fed a cricket injected with l-DOPA were only one-third as aggressive after treatment. As l-DOPA treatment did not affect general motor activity, the effect appears to be directly associated with aggression. This is supported by the observation that l-DOPA treatment delayed latency to eyespot darkening, which predicts the latency to aggression.",
keywords = "Aggression, Dopamine, Eyespot, Lizard, Norepinephrine, Serotonin",
author = "Erik H{\"o}glund and Korzan, {Wayne J.} and Watt, {Michael J.} and Forster, {Gina L.} and Summers, {Tangi R.} and Johannessen, {Helga Falch} and Renner, {Kenneth J.} and Summers, {Cliff H.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbr.2004.05.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "156",
pages = "53--64",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of L-DOPA on aggressive behavior and central monoaminergic activity in the lizard Anolis carolinensis, using a new method for drug delivery

AU - Höglund, Erik

AU - Korzan, Wayne J.

AU - Watt, Michael J.

AU - Forster, Gina L.

AU - Summers, Tangi R.

AU - Johannessen, Helga Falch

AU - Renner, Kenneth J.

AU - Summers, Cliff H.

PY - 2005/1/6

Y1 - 2005/1/6

N2 - The dopamine (DA) precursor, l-DOPA (500 μg), was injected into living crickets, which were ingested (one each) by adult male Anolis carolinensis. This method of delivery elevated plasma l-DOPA and DA concentrations by ∼1000-fold. In contrast, plasma epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) were not influenced by l-DOPA treatment, although they were elevated following the consumption of the cricket. Lizards that ingested l-DOPA treated crickets had elevated l-DOPA in all brain regions measured, with DA and/or DOPAC also increased significantly in most brain regions studied. Despite increased DA levels in the striatum and nucleus accumbens as a response to l-DOPA, the treatment had no influence on general motor activity. Central serotonin, NE, and Epi systems were not affected in any brain region by oral l-DOPA treatment. In addition, aggression was inhibited by this dose of l-DOPA, even though there was no effect on serotonergic systems. This is surprising because controlling aggressive behavior is usually considered the province of serotonergic activity. Aggression was measured before and after treatment, and while saline-treated lizards retained the full vigor of aggressive activity, those fed a cricket injected with l-DOPA were only one-third as aggressive after treatment. As l-DOPA treatment did not affect general motor activity, the effect appears to be directly associated with aggression. This is supported by the observation that l-DOPA treatment delayed latency to eyespot darkening, which predicts the latency to aggression.

AB - The dopamine (DA) precursor, l-DOPA (500 μg), was injected into living crickets, which were ingested (one each) by adult male Anolis carolinensis. This method of delivery elevated plasma l-DOPA and DA concentrations by ∼1000-fold. In contrast, plasma epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) were not influenced by l-DOPA treatment, although they were elevated following the consumption of the cricket. Lizards that ingested l-DOPA treated crickets had elevated l-DOPA in all brain regions measured, with DA and/or DOPAC also increased significantly in most brain regions studied. Despite increased DA levels in the striatum and nucleus accumbens as a response to l-DOPA, the treatment had no influence on general motor activity. Central serotonin, NE, and Epi systems were not affected in any brain region by oral l-DOPA treatment. In addition, aggression was inhibited by this dose of l-DOPA, even though there was no effect on serotonergic systems. This is surprising because controlling aggressive behavior is usually considered the province of serotonergic activity. Aggression was measured before and after treatment, and while saline-treated lizards retained the full vigor of aggressive activity, those fed a cricket injected with l-DOPA were only one-third as aggressive after treatment. As l-DOPA treatment did not affect general motor activity, the effect appears to be directly associated with aggression. This is supported by the observation that l-DOPA treatment delayed latency to eyespot darkening, which predicts the latency to aggression.

KW - Aggression

KW - Dopamine

KW - Eyespot

KW - Lizard

KW - Norepinephrine

KW - Serotonin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4944222312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4944222312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbr.2004.05.009

DO - 10.1016/j.bbr.2004.05.009

M3 - Article

C2 - 15474650

AN - SCOPUS:4944222312

VL - 156

SP - 53

EP - 64

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

IS - 1

ER -