Effects of forced convection and surface tension during methanol droplet combustion

Vasudevan Raghavan, Daniel N. Pope, George Gogos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A numerical investigation of surface tension and forced convection effects on moving and suspended methanol droplets burning in a zero-gravity, low-pressure air environment is presented. Simulations were conducted using a predictive, transient, axisymmetric model for an initial droplet diameter of 0.5 mm, an ambient temperature of 1200 K, and initial Reynolds numbers (Re 0) in the range of 1-100. Results indicate that, for moving droplets, due to the presence of an envelope flame at some stage during the droplet lifetime, surface tension is important over the range of Re 0 considered; the extinction diameter decreases with increasing Re 0. For suspended droplets, when transition or envelope flame is present (Re 0 less than approximately 15), surface tension is important; when an envelope flame is present (Re 0 less than approximately 10), the extinction diameter increases with Re 0. Both for suspended and moving droplets, the droplet lifetime is weakly sensitive to surface tension. The variation of droplet lifetimes with Re 0 is much stronger for suspended droplets than for moving droplets. Depending on the Reynolds number, results on methanol droplet lifetimes and extinction diameters measured through suspended droplet experiments may not be applicable to moving droplets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-798
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

Fingerprint

forced convection
Forced convection
Methanol
Surface tension
interfacial tension
methyl alcohol
flames
life (durability)
extinction
envelopes
Reynolds number
weightlessness
ambient temperature
convection
low pressure
air
simulation
Gravitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Effects of forced convection and surface tension during methanol droplet combustion. / Raghavan, Vasudevan; Pope, Daniel N.; Gogos, George.

In: Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.10.2006, p. 787-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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