Effects of a supplement designed to increase ATP levels on muscle strength, power output, and endurance

Trent J. Herda, Eric D. Ryan, Jeffrey R. Stout, Joel T. Cramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The present study examined the acute effects of a nutritional supplement intended to improve adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations on vertical jump height, isometric strength of the leg extensors, leg extension endurance, and forearm flexion endurance. Methods: Twenty-four healthy men (mean age ± SD = 23 ± 4 yrs, stature = 181 ± 7 cm, and body mass = 82 ± 12 kg) volunteered to complete a familiarization trial plus 2 randomly-ordered experimental trials separated by a 7-day washout period. Participants received either 6 (body mass < 91 kg) or 8 (body mass ≥ 91 kg) tablets of the treatment (TR; 625 mg of adenylpyrophosphoric acid and calcium pyruvate, 350.8 mg of cordyceps sinensis extract and yohimbine hydrochloride) or placebo (PL; 980 mg of microcrystalline cellulose) 1 hour prior to the following tests: countermovement vertical jump (CVJ), forearm flexion repetitions to exhaustion, isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the leg extensors, and a 50-repetition maximal concentric isokinetic leg extension endurance test. Results: There were no differences between the TR and PL trials for CVJ height (P > 0.05), isometric MVC peak torque (P > 0.05), maximal concentric isokinetic peak torque (P > 0.05), percent decline during the leg extension endurance tests (P > 0.05), or repetitions to exhaustion during the forearm flexion endurance tests (P > 0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicated no improvements in the measured variables as a result of ingesting this nutritional supplement. Future studies should examine whether chronic supplementation or a loading period is necessary to observe any ergogenic effects of this supplement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3
JournalJournal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 29 2008

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muscle strength
adenosine triphosphate
Muscle Strength
Leg
legs
Adenosine Triphosphate
torque
Torque
Forearm
dietary supplements
Performance-Enhancing Substances
acute effects
testing
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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Effects of a supplement designed to increase ATP levels on muscle strength, power output, and endurance. / Herda, Trent J.; Ryan, Eric D.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Cramer, Joel T.

In: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, Vol. 5, 3, 29.01.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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