Effectiveness of DVD vs. group-initiated diabetes prevention on information uptake for high & low health literacy participants

Cody Goessl, Paul Estabrooks, Wen You, Denise H Britigan, Armando DeAlba, Fabio Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study evaluates the effectiveness of technology versus in-person, group-initiated diabetes prevention to enhance comprehension of learning objectives between patients with differing health literacy (HL). Methods: Evidence-based content through either a DVD (n = 217)or in-person, group class (n = 225)to initiate the intervention. A teach-back call was used to assess comprehension of, and reinforce, learning objectives. Chi-squared was used to determine differences between conditions (DVD vs Class)and HL levels (High n = 361 vs. Low n = 81)and regression analyses were used to examine relationships. Results: DVD participants performed significantly better across teach back questions (15.4 ± 2.5 v. 14.8 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), demonstrated comprehension in fewer teach-back rounds (1.9 ± 0.7 v. 2.1 ± 0.7, p < 0.01), and answered more questions correctly on the first try (4.2 ± 1.6 v. 3.4 ± 1.8, p < 0.01). Models for HL levels and modality by HL level were statistically significant (p < 0.01)favoring the DVD. Conclusion: Initiating a diabetes prevention program with the use of a DVD appears to be a superior option to in-person, class sessions. Teach-back and teach-to-goal strategies enables participants of both high and low health literacy levels to receive and confirm mastery of diabetes prevention objectives. Practice Implications: A teach-back call may improve information uptake increasing the likelihood of health behavior uptake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)968-975
Number of pages8
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume102
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Learning
Health Behavior
Health Status
Regression Analysis
Technology

Keywords

  • Diabetes prevention
  • Health literacy
  • Information uptake
  • Teach-back
  • Teach-to-goal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effectiveness of DVD vs. group-initiated diabetes prevention on information uptake for high & low health literacy participants. / Goessl, Cody; Estabrooks, Paul; You, Wen; Britigan, Denise H; DeAlba, Armando; Almeida, Fabio.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 102, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 968-975.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goessl, Cody ; Estabrooks, Paul ; You, Wen ; Britigan, Denise H ; DeAlba, Armando ; Almeida, Fabio. / Effectiveness of DVD vs. group-initiated diabetes prevention on information uptake for high & low health literacy participants. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2019 ; Vol. 102, No. 5. pp. 968-975.
@article{a9a94b6de4764ba1aec604fee896c4d3,
title = "Effectiveness of DVD vs. group-initiated diabetes prevention on information uptake for high & low health literacy participants",
abstract = "Objective: This study evaluates the effectiveness of technology versus in-person, group-initiated diabetes prevention to enhance comprehension of learning objectives between patients with differing health literacy (HL). Methods: Evidence-based content through either a DVD (n = 217)or in-person, group class (n = 225)to initiate the intervention. A teach-back call was used to assess comprehension of, and reinforce, learning objectives. Chi-squared was used to determine differences between conditions (DVD vs Class)and HL levels (High n = 361 vs. Low n = 81)and regression analyses were used to examine relationships. Results: DVD participants performed significantly better across teach back questions (15.4 ± 2.5 v. 14.8 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), demonstrated comprehension in fewer teach-back rounds (1.9 ± 0.7 v. 2.1 ± 0.7, p < 0.01), and answered more questions correctly on the first try (4.2 ± 1.6 v. 3.4 ± 1.8, p < 0.01). Models for HL levels and modality by HL level were statistically significant (p < 0.01)favoring the DVD. Conclusion: Initiating a diabetes prevention program with the use of a DVD appears to be a superior option to in-person, class sessions. Teach-back and teach-to-goal strategies enables participants of both high and low health literacy levels to receive and confirm mastery of diabetes prevention objectives. Practice Implications: A teach-back call may improve information uptake increasing the likelihood of health behavior uptake.",
keywords = "Diabetes prevention, Health literacy, Information uptake, Teach-back, Teach-to-goal",
author = "Cody Goessl and Paul Estabrooks and Wen You and Britigan, {Denise H} and Armando DeAlba and Fabio Almeida",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2018.12.026",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "102",
pages = "968--975",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effectiveness of DVD vs. group-initiated diabetes prevention on information uptake for high & low health literacy participants

AU - Goessl, Cody

AU - Estabrooks, Paul

AU - You, Wen

AU - Britigan, Denise H

AU - DeAlba, Armando

AU - Almeida, Fabio

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Objective: This study evaluates the effectiveness of technology versus in-person, group-initiated diabetes prevention to enhance comprehension of learning objectives between patients with differing health literacy (HL). Methods: Evidence-based content through either a DVD (n = 217)or in-person, group class (n = 225)to initiate the intervention. A teach-back call was used to assess comprehension of, and reinforce, learning objectives. Chi-squared was used to determine differences between conditions (DVD vs Class)and HL levels (High n = 361 vs. Low n = 81)and regression analyses were used to examine relationships. Results: DVD participants performed significantly better across teach back questions (15.4 ± 2.5 v. 14.8 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), demonstrated comprehension in fewer teach-back rounds (1.9 ± 0.7 v. 2.1 ± 0.7, p < 0.01), and answered more questions correctly on the first try (4.2 ± 1.6 v. 3.4 ± 1.8, p < 0.01). Models for HL levels and modality by HL level were statistically significant (p < 0.01)favoring the DVD. Conclusion: Initiating a diabetes prevention program with the use of a DVD appears to be a superior option to in-person, class sessions. Teach-back and teach-to-goal strategies enables participants of both high and low health literacy levels to receive and confirm mastery of diabetes prevention objectives. Practice Implications: A teach-back call may improve information uptake increasing the likelihood of health behavior uptake.

AB - Objective: This study evaluates the effectiveness of technology versus in-person, group-initiated diabetes prevention to enhance comprehension of learning objectives between patients with differing health literacy (HL). Methods: Evidence-based content through either a DVD (n = 217)or in-person, group class (n = 225)to initiate the intervention. A teach-back call was used to assess comprehension of, and reinforce, learning objectives. Chi-squared was used to determine differences between conditions (DVD vs Class)and HL levels (High n = 361 vs. Low n = 81)and regression analyses were used to examine relationships. Results: DVD participants performed significantly better across teach back questions (15.4 ± 2.5 v. 14.8 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), demonstrated comprehension in fewer teach-back rounds (1.9 ± 0.7 v. 2.1 ± 0.7, p < 0.01), and answered more questions correctly on the first try (4.2 ± 1.6 v. 3.4 ± 1.8, p < 0.01). Models for HL levels and modality by HL level were statistically significant (p < 0.01)favoring the DVD. Conclusion: Initiating a diabetes prevention program with the use of a DVD appears to be a superior option to in-person, class sessions. Teach-back and teach-to-goal strategies enables participants of both high and low health literacy levels to receive and confirm mastery of diabetes prevention objectives. Practice Implications: A teach-back call may improve information uptake increasing the likelihood of health behavior uptake.

KW - Diabetes prevention

KW - Health literacy

KW - Information uptake

KW - Teach-back

KW - Teach-to-goal

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060074777&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060074777&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2018.12.026

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2018.12.026

M3 - Article

VL - 102

SP - 968

EP - 975

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 5

ER -