Effectiveness of a worksite-based weight loss randomized controlled trial: The worksite study

Fabio A. Almeida, Wen You, Samantha M. Harden, Kacie C.A. Blackman, Brenda M. Davy, Russell E. Glasgow, Jennie L. Hill, Laura A. Linnan, Sarah S. Wall, Jackie Yenerall, Jamie M. Zoellner, Paul A. Estabrooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine the effectiveness of an individually targeted Internet-based intervention with monetary incentives (INCENT) at reducing weight of overweight and obese employees when compared with a less-intensive intervention (Livin' My Weigh [LMW]) 6 months after program initiation. Methods Twenty-eight worksites were randomly assigned to either INCENT or LMW conditions. Both programs used evidence-based strategies to support weight loss. INCENT was delivered via daily e-mails over 12 months while LMW was delivered quarterly via both newsletters and on-site educational sessions. Generalized linear mixed models were conducted for weight change from baseline to 6 months post-program and using an intention-to-treat analysis to include all participants with baseline weight measurements. Results Across 28 worksites, 1,790 employees (M = 47 years of age; 79% Caucasian; 74% women) participated. Participants lost an average of 2.27 lbs (P < 0.001) with a BMI decrease of 0.36 kg/m2 (P < 0.001) and 1.30 lbs (P < 0.01) with a BMI decrease of 0.20 kg/m2 (P < 0.01) in INCENT and LMW, respectively. The differences between INCENT and LMW in weight loss and BMI reduction were not statistically significant. Conclusions This study suggests that INCENT and a minimal intervention alternative may be effective approaches to help decrease the overall obesity burden within worksites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)737-745
Number of pages9
JournalObesity
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Workplace
Motivation
Weight Loss
Randomized Controlled Trials
Weights and Measures
Intention to Treat Analysis
Postal Service
Internet
Linear Models
Obesity

Keywords

  • behavioral intervention
  • e-mail
  • incentives
  • obesity
  • worksite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Effectiveness of a worksite-based weight loss randomized controlled trial : The worksite study. / Almeida, Fabio A.; You, Wen; Harden, Samantha M.; Blackman, Kacie C.A.; Davy, Brenda M.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Hill, Jennie L.; Linnan, Laura A.; Wall, Sarah S.; Yenerall, Jackie; Zoellner, Jamie M.; Estabrooks, Paul A.

In: Obesity, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 737-745.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Almeida, FA, You, W, Harden, SM, Blackman, KCA, Davy, BM, Glasgow, RE, Hill, JL, Linnan, LA, Wall, SS, Yenerall, J, Zoellner, JM & Estabrooks, PA 2015, 'Effectiveness of a worksite-based weight loss randomized controlled trial: The worksite study', Obesity, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 737-745. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20899
Almeida, Fabio A. ; You, Wen ; Harden, Samantha M. ; Blackman, Kacie C.A. ; Davy, Brenda M. ; Glasgow, Russell E. ; Hill, Jennie L. ; Linnan, Laura A. ; Wall, Sarah S. ; Yenerall, Jackie ; Zoellner, Jamie M. ; Estabrooks, Paul A. / Effectiveness of a worksite-based weight loss randomized controlled trial : The worksite study. In: Obesity. 2015 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 737-745.
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