Effect of surface nanoscale topography on elastic modulus of individual osteoblastic cells as determined by atomic force microscopy

Joshua C. Hansen, Jung Y Lim, Li Chong Xu, Christopher A. Siedlecki, David T. Mauger, Henry J. Donahue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanical stimulation of osteoblasts by fluid flow promotes a variety of pro-differentiation effects and improving the efficiency of these mechanical signals could encourage specific differentiation pathways. One way this could be accomplished is by altering mechanical properties of osteoblasts. In this study, murine osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on surfaces covered with nanometer-sized islands to examine the hypothesis that the elastic modulus of osteoblastic cells is affected by nanoscale topography. Nanoislands were produced by polymer demixing of polystyrene and poly(bromostyrene), which leads to a segregated polymer system and formation of nanometer-sized topographical features. The elastic modulus of MC3T3-E1 cells was determined using atomic force microscopy in conjunction with the Hertz mathematical model. Osteoblastic cells cultured on nanotopographic surfaces (11-38 nm high islands) had a different distribution of cellular modulus values, e.g., the distribution shifted toward higher modulus values, relative to cells on flat control surfaces. There were also differences in cell modulus distribution between two flat controls as surface chemistry was changed between polystyrene and glass. Taken together, our results demonstrate that both surface nanotopography and chemistry affect the mechanical properties of cells and may provide new methods for altering the response of cells to external mechanical signals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2865-2871
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume40
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 17 2007

Fingerprint

Atomic Force Microscopy
Elastic Modulus
Surface topography
Atomic force microscopy
Elastic moduli
Osteoblasts
Polystyrenes
Mechanical properties
Control surfaces
Polymers
Surface chemistry
Islands
Topography
Flow of fluids
Cultured Cells
Mathematical models
Glass
Theoretical Models

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Elastic modulus
  • Hertz model
  • Nanotopography
  • Osteoblast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Effect of surface nanoscale topography on elastic modulus of individual osteoblastic cells as determined by atomic force microscopy. / Hansen, Joshua C.; Lim, Jung Y; Xu, Li Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Mauger, David T.; Donahue, Henry J.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 40, No. 13, 17.09.2007, p. 2865-2871.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hansen, Joshua C. ; Lim, Jung Y ; Xu, Li Chong ; Siedlecki, Christopher A. ; Mauger, David T. ; Donahue, Henry J. / Effect of surface nanoscale topography on elastic modulus of individual osteoblastic cells as determined by atomic force microscopy. In: Journal of Biomechanics. 2007 ; Vol. 40, No. 13. pp. 2865-2871.
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