Effect of iron substitution on the high-temperature properties of Sm(Co, Cu, Ti)z permanent magnets

Jian Zhou, Ralph Skomski, David J Sellmyer, Wei Tang, George C. Hadjipanayis

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Recently, Ti-substituted Sm-Co permanent magnets have attracted renewed attention due to their interesting high-temperature coercivity. Our presentation deals with the effect of iron substitutions on the magnetic properties of the materials. X-ray diffraction shows that the investigated Sm(Co, Fe, Cu, Ti)z materials (z = 7.0 - 7.6) are two-phase magnets, consisting of 1:5 and 2:17 regions. The iron content affects both the coercivity and the magnetization. Depending on composition and heat treatment, some samples show a positive temperature coefficient of the coercivity in the temperature range from 22°C to 550°C. Moderate amounts of iron enhance the room-temperature coercivity. For example, the room-temperature coercivity of Sm(Co6.0Fe0.4Cu0.6Ti0.3) is 9.6 kOe, as compared to 7.6 kOe for Sm(Co6.4Cu0.6Ti0.3). At high temperatures, the addition of Fe has a deteriorating effect on the coercivity, which is as high as 10.0 kOe at 500°C for Sm(Co6.4Cu0.6Ti0.3). The room-temperature magnetization increases on iron substitution, from 73 emu/g for Sm(Co6.4Cu0.6Ti0.3) to 78 emu/g for Sm(Co6.0Fe0.4Cu0.6Ti0.3). The observed temperature dependence is ascribed to the preferential dumbbell-site occupancy of the Fe atoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMaterials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings
Volume674
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
EventApplications of Ferromagnetic and Optical Materials, Storage and Magnotoelectronics - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Apr 16 2001Apr 20 2001

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High temperature properties
permanent magnets
Permanent magnets
coercivity
Coercive force
Substitution reactions
Iron
substitutes
iron
Temperature
room temperature
Magnetization
magnetization
Positive temperature coefficient
heat treatment
magnets
Magnets
Magnetic properties
magnetic properties
Heat treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Effect of iron substitution on the high-temperature properties of Sm(Co, Cu, Ti)z permanent magnets. / Zhou, Jian; Skomski, Ralph; Sellmyer, David J; Tang, Wei; Hadjipanayis, George C.

In: Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings, Vol. 674, 01.12.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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abstract = "Recently, Ti-substituted Sm-Co permanent magnets have attracted renewed attention due to their interesting high-temperature coercivity. Our presentation deals with the effect of iron substitutions on the magnetic properties of the materials. X-ray diffraction shows that the investigated Sm(Co, Fe, Cu, Ti)z materials (z = 7.0 - 7.6) are two-phase magnets, consisting of 1:5 and 2:17 regions. The iron content affects both the coercivity and the magnetization. Depending on composition and heat treatment, some samples show a positive temperature coefficient of the coercivity in the temperature range from 22°C to 550°C. Moderate amounts of iron enhance the room-temperature coercivity. For example, the room-temperature coercivity of Sm(Co6.0Fe0.4Cu0.6Ti0.3) is 9.6 kOe, as compared to 7.6 kOe for Sm(Co6.4Cu0.6Ti0.3). At high temperatures, the addition of Fe has a deteriorating effect on the coercivity, which is as high as 10.0 kOe at 500°C for Sm(Co6.4Cu0.6Ti0.3). The room-temperature magnetization increases on iron substitution, from 73 emu/g for Sm(Co6.4Cu0.6Ti0.3) to 78 emu/g for Sm(Co6.0Fe0.4Cu0.6Ti0.3). The observed temperature dependence is ascribed to the preferential dumbbell-site occupancy of the Fe atoms.",
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