Effect of dietary antioxidants and phenobarbital pretreatment on microsomal lipid peroxidation and activation by carbon tetrachloride

Steve L. Taylor, Al L. Tappel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of the dietary antioxidants, vitamin E and selenium, and the effect of phenobarbital pretreatment on in vitro NADPH-dependent microsomal lipid peroxidation and the activation of microsomal lipid peroxidation by CCl4 were studied. The rate of microsomal lipid peroxidation decreased as a function of dietary anti-oxidant, while the degree of CCl4 activation increased. Phenobarbital pretreatment diminished the antioxidant inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation found with microsomes from rats fed high levels of antioxidant. Phenobarbital pretreatment lowered the extent of lipid peroxidation as measured by malonaldehyde production but had little effect on the rate of lipid peroxidation as measured by oxygen uptake. The kinetics of lipid peroxidation and the stoichiometry of the reaction were assessed as a function of dietary antioxidant. The findings suggest that at low microsomal antioxidant concentrations, the lipid peroxidation reaction occurs at a maximal rate dependent upon some rate-limiting step, such as the reduction of Fe+3, which is unaffected by CCl4 addition. Conversely, at high microsomal antioxidant concentrations, the antioxidant termination reactions appear to determine the overall reaction rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1151-1160
Number of pages10
JournalLife Sciences
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 1976

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Carbon Tetrachloride
Phenobarbital
Lipid Peroxidation
Antioxidants
Chemical activation
Lipids
Selenium
Microsomes
Malondialdehyde
Vitamin E
NADP
Oxidants
Stoichiometry
Reaction rates
Rats
Oxygen
Kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Effect of dietary antioxidants and phenobarbital pretreatment on microsomal lipid peroxidation and activation by carbon tetrachloride. / Taylor, Steve L.; Tappel, Al L.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 19, No. 8, 15.10.1976, p. 1151-1160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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