Effect of booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid on sudden death syndrome mortality rate among feedlot cattle

Bradley D. De Groot, Catherine E. Dewey, D. Dee Griffin, Louis J. Perino, Rodney A. Moxley, G. Le Roy Hahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine whether booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid would affect the sudden death syndrome (SDS) mortality rate among feedlot cattle. Design - Field trial. Animals - 83,115 cattle at a Nebraska feedlot. Procedure - Cattle arriving at the feedlot underwent routine processing according to established protocol. All cattle received a sequentially numbered ear tag and a 2-ml dose of a multivalent bacterin-toxoid designed to protect cattle against Clostridium chauvoei, C septicum, C novyi, C sordellii, and C perfringens types C and D. Approximately 90 days prior to slaughter, growth promotants were implanted in all cattle, and cattle were allocated to a treatment or control group on the basis of the last digits of their ear tag numbers. Cattle in the treatment group received a second 2-ml dose of clostridial bacterin-toxoid; control cattle did not. Results - Significant differences between groups in regard to crude, feeding pen, or SDS mortality rates were not detected. Sudden death syndrome mortality rate across both groups was 0.24%. If the SDS mortality rate in midwestern feedlot cattle was reduced ≥ 40% by booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid, this experiment included enough animals to have a 90% probability of detecting that difference. Clinical Implications - Booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid does not affect SDS mortality rate among feedlot cattle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-753
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume211
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 15 1997

Fingerprint

Bacterial Vaccines
Toxoids
toxoids
Sudden Death
feedlots
Vaccination
death
Mortality
cattle
ear tags
Ear
Clostridium chauvoei
secondary immunization
dosage
animals
field experimentation
slaughter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effect of booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid on sudden death syndrome mortality rate among feedlot cattle. / De Groot, Bradley D.; Dewey, Catherine E.; Griffin, D. Dee; Perino, Louis J.; Moxley, Rodney A.; Hahn, G. Le Roy.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 211, No. 6, 15.09.1997, p. 749-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Groot, Bradley D. ; Dewey, Catherine E. ; Griffin, D. Dee ; Perino, Louis J. ; Moxley, Rodney A. ; Hahn, G. Le Roy. / Effect of booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid on sudden death syndrome mortality rate among feedlot cattle. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 1997 ; Vol. 211, No. 6. pp. 749-753.
@article{692894306d5a48a08624054e35c81c64,
title = "Effect of booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid on sudden death syndrome mortality rate among feedlot cattle",
abstract = "Objective - To determine whether booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid would affect the sudden death syndrome (SDS) mortality rate among feedlot cattle. Design - Field trial. Animals - 83,115 cattle at a Nebraska feedlot. Procedure - Cattle arriving at the feedlot underwent routine processing according to established protocol. All cattle received a sequentially numbered ear tag and a 2-ml dose of a multivalent bacterin-toxoid designed to protect cattle against Clostridium chauvoei, C septicum, C novyi, C sordellii, and C perfringens types C and D. Approximately 90 days prior to slaughter, growth promotants were implanted in all cattle, and cattle were allocated to a treatment or control group on the basis of the last digits of their ear tag numbers. Cattle in the treatment group received a second 2-ml dose of clostridial bacterin-toxoid; control cattle did not. Results - Significant differences between groups in regard to crude, feeding pen, or SDS mortality rates were not detected. Sudden death syndrome mortality rate across both groups was 0.24{\%}. If the SDS mortality rate in midwestern feedlot cattle was reduced ≥ 40{\%} by booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid, this experiment included enough animals to have a 90{\%} probability of detecting that difference. Clinical Implications - Booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid does not affect SDS mortality rate among feedlot cattle.",
author = "{De Groot}, {Bradley D.} and Dewey, {Catherine E.} and Griffin, {D. Dee} and Perino, {Louis J.} and Moxley, {Rodney A.} and Hahn, {G. Le Roy}",
year = "1997",
month = "9",
day = "15",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "211",
pages = "749--753",
journal = "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association",
issn = "0003-1488",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid on sudden death syndrome mortality rate among feedlot cattle

AU - De Groot, Bradley D.

AU - Dewey, Catherine E.

AU - Griffin, D. Dee

AU - Perino, Louis J.

AU - Moxley, Rodney A.

AU - Hahn, G. Le Roy

PY - 1997/9/15

Y1 - 1997/9/15

N2 - Objective - To determine whether booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid would affect the sudden death syndrome (SDS) mortality rate among feedlot cattle. Design - Field trial. Animals - 83,115 cattle at a Nebraska feedlot. Procedure - Cattle arriving at the feedlot underwent routine processing according to established protocol. All cattle received a sequentially numbered ear tag and a 2-ml dose of a multivalent bacterin-toxoid designed to protect cattle against Clostridium chauvoei, C septicum, C novyi, C sordellii, and C perfringens types C and D. Approximately 90 days prior to slaughter, growth promotants were implanted in all cattle, and cattle were allocated to a treatment or control group on the basis of the last digits of their ear tag numbers. Cattle in the treatment group received a second 2-ml dose of clostridial bacterin-toxoid; control cattle did not. Results - Significant differences between groups in regard to crude, feeding pen, or SDS mortality rates were not detected. Sudden death syndrome mortality rate across both groups was 0.24%. If the SDS mortality rate in midwestern feedlot cattle was reduced ≥ 40% by booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid, this experiment included enough animals to have a 90% probability of detecting that difference. Clinical Implications - Booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid does not affect SDS mortality rate among feedlot cattle.

AB - Objective - To determine whether booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid would affect the sudden death syndrome (SDS) mortality rate among feedlot cattle. Design - Field trial. Animals - 83,115 cattle at a Nebraska feedlot. Procedure - Cattle arriving at the feedlot underwent routine processing according to established protocol. All cattle received a sequentially numbered ear tag and a 2-ml dose of a multivalent bacterin-toxoid designed to protect cattle against Clostridium chauvoei, C septicum, C novyi, C sordellii, and C perfringens types C and D. Approximately 90 days prior to slaughter, growth promotants were implanted in all cattle, and cattle were allocated to a treatment or control group on the basis of the last digits of their ear tag numbers. Cattle in the treatment group received a second 2-ml dose of clostridial bacterin-toxoid; control cattle did not. Results - Significant differences between groups in regard to crude, feeding pen, or SDS mortality rates were not detected. Sudden death syndrome mortality rate across both groups was 0.24%. If the SDS mortality rate in midwestern feedlot cattle was reduced ≥ 40% by booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid, this experiment included enough animals to have a 90% probability of detecting that difference. Clinical Implications - Booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid does not affect SDS mortality rate among feedlot cattle.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031571827&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031571827&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9301747

AN - SCOPUS:0031571827

VL - 211

SP - 749

EP - 753

JO - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SN - 0003-1488

IS - 6

ER -