Effect of antiretroviral therapy and hepatitis C co-infection on changes in lipid levels in HIV-infected patients 48 weeks after initiation of therapy

Jack T. Stapleton, K. Bennett, R. J. Bosch, P. M. Polgreen, Susan Swindells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) commonly co-infects HIV-infected individuals. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with elevated serum lipid levels, and HCV infection is associated with low serum lipid levels. Fasting lipid levels were investigated in 1,434 ART-naïve HIV-infected people participating in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials (ALLRT) protocol who prospectively initiated ART with ≥3 agents. Subjects with elevated liver-associated enzymes (>5 x ULN) were excluded. Demographics, body mass index, HCV status, CD4 cell count, HIV RNA, liver enzymes, lipid levels, and glucose were assessed before and following 48 weeks of ART. HCV-positive subjects (n = 160; 11%) were older, more likely to be Black, have a history of intravenous drug use (IDU), have higher baseline liver-associated enzyme levels than the HCV-negative group (p < .001 for each), and to have diabetes at baseline (5% vs. 2%, p = .07). Lipid levels rose in both groups following ART, and the differences were not significant except that HDL levels increased significantly more in the HCV-positive group (p = .006). In summary, HCV infection did not appear to provide significant protection against ART-induced hyperlipidemia in this cohort of HIV-infected subjects prospectively enrolled in ART trials, although HDL levels rose to a greater degree.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-436
Number of pages8
JournalHIV Clinical Trials
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Coinfection
Hepacivirus
HIV
Lipids
Virus Diseases
Therapeutics
Liver
Enzymes
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Clinical Protocols
Hyperlipidemias
Serum
Fasting
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Body Mass Index
Demography
Clinical Trials
RNA
Glucose

Keywords

  • Dyslipidemia
  • HIV infection
  • Hepatitis C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Effect of antiretroviral therapy and hepatitis C co-infection on changes in lipid levels in HIV-infected patients 48 weeks after initiation of therapy. / Stapleton, Jack T.; Bennett, K.; Bosch, R. J.; Polgreen, P. M.; Swindells, Susan.

In: HIV Clinical Trials, Vol. 8, No. 6, 01.11.2007, p. 429-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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