Effect of aging on mechanical stresses, deformations, and hemodynamics in human femoropopliteal artery due to limb flexion

Anastasia Desyatova, Jason N Mactaggart, Rodrigo Romarowski, William Poulson, Michele Conti, Alexey Kamenskiy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Femoropopliteal artery (FPA) reconstructions are notorious for poor clinical outcomes. Mechanical and flow conditions that occur in the FPA with limb flexion are thought to play a significant role, but are poorly characterized. FPA deformations due to acute limb flexion were quantified using a human cadaver model and used to build a finite element model that simulated surrounding tissue forces associated with limb flexion-induced deformations. Strains and intramural principal mechanical stresses were determined for seven age groups. Computational fluid dynamics analysis was performed to assess hemodynamic variables. FPA shape, stresses, and hemodynamics significantly changed with age. Younger arteries assumed straighter positions in the flexed limb with less pronounced bends and more uniform stress distribution along the length of the artery. Even in the flexed limb posture, FPAs younger than 50 years of age experienced tension, while older FPAs experienced compression. Aging resulted in localization of principal mechanical stresses to the adductor hiatus and popliteal artery below the knee that are typically prone to developing vascular pathology. Maximum principal stresses in these areas increased threefold to fivefold with age with largest increase observed at the adductor hiatus. Atheroprotective wall shear stress reduced after 35 years of age, and atheroprone and oscillatory shear stresses increased after the age of 50. These data can help better understand FPA pathophysiology and can inform the design of targeted materials and devices for peripheral arterial disease treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-189
Number of pages9
JournalBiomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Mechanical Stress
Hemodynamics
Arteries
Extremities
Aging of materials
Shear stress
Pathology
Dynamic analysis
Stress concentration
Computational fluid dynamics
Compaction
Popliteal Artery
Tissue
Pathophysiology
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Wall Shear Stress
Hydrodynamics
Human
Posture
Cadaver

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Deformation
  • Femoropopliteal artery
  • Hemodynamics
  • Limb flexion
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Effect of aging on mechanical stresses, deformations, and hemodynamics in human femoropopliteal artery due to limb flexion. / Desyatova, Anastasia; Mactaggart, Jason N; Romarowski, Rodrigo; Poulson, William; Conti, Michele; Kamenskiy, Alexey.

In: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 181-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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