Dyslipidaemia in HIV-infected patients

Association with adherence to potent antiretroviral therapy

E. N. Vergis, D. L. Paterson, M. M. Wagener, Susan Swindells, N. Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic complications are being increasingly recognized among HIV-infected patients treated with potent combination antiretroviral therapies. We sought to assess the association of dyslipidaemia with adherence to protease inhibitor (PI) therapy and with the markers of clinical response to antiretroviral therapy (CD4 count, HIV RNA viral level) through a prospective, cross-sectional cohort study. Fifty-six HIV-infected patients who were already on, or who were started on PI-containing antiretroviral therapy were monitored for the development of dyslipidaemias. Therapy with PI-containing antiretroviral therapy was significantly associated with elevated serum triglyceride level (> 250 mg/dl) (52% vs 8%, P=0.001). Patients with an adherence rate of at least 80% to a PI-containing regimen were significantly more likely to have elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level as compared to patients with an adherence rate of <80% (79% vs 26%, P=0.03). Patients with an adherence rate of at least 80% to a PI-containing regimen were also significantly more likely to have severe hypertriglyceridaemia (>800 mg/dl) as compared to patients with an adherence rate of <80% (21% vs 4%, P=0.04). Viral load at the last study visit did not correlate with total cholesterol (r=-0.39, P=0.30), LDL cholesterol (r=0.57, P=0.30), or triglyceride level (r=0.55, P=0.20). However, there was a significant correlation between the last viral load and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (r=0.79, P=0.035), i.e. lower viral load was associated with higher HDL cholesterol level. In conclusion, dyslipidaemia in patients with HIV infection was significantly associated with adherence to PI-containing antiretroviral therapy. Patients who are adherent to PI-containing regimens at least 80% of the time warrant close monitoring for the development of dyslipidaemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-468
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 28 2001

Fingerprint

Dyslipidemias
Protease Inhibitors
HIV
Patient Compliance
Viral Load
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Therapeutics
Triglycerides
Viral RNA
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
HIV Infections
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Biomarkers
Cholesterol
Serum

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Dyslipidaemia
  • Lipodystrophy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Dyslipidaemia in HIV-infected patients : Association with adherence to potent antiretroviral therapy. / Vergis, E. N.; Paterson, D. L.; Wagener, M. M.; Swindells, Susan; Singh, N.

In: International Journal of STD and AIDS, Vol. 12, No. 7, 28.07.2001, p. 463-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vergis, E. N. ; Paterson, D. L. ; Wagener, M. M. ; Swindells, Susan ; Singh, N. / Dyslipidaemia in HIV-infected patients : Association with adherence to potent antiretroviral therapy. In: International Journal of STD and AIDS. 2001 ; Vol. 12, No. 7. pp. 463-468.
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