Dual polarity accurate mass calibration for electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using maltooligosaccharides

Brian H. Clowers, Eric D. Dodds, Richard R. Seipert, Carlito B. Lebrilla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In view of the fact that memory effects associated with instrument calibration hinder the use of many mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios and tuning standards, identification of robust, comprehensive, inexpensive, and memory-free calibration standards is of particular interest to the mass spectrometry community. Glucose and its isomers are known to have a residue mass of 162.05282 Da; therefore, both linear and branched forms of polyhexose oligosaccharides possess well-defined masses, making them ideal candidates for mass calibration. Using a wide range of maltooligosaccharides (MOSs) derived from commercially available beers, ions with m/z ratios from approximately 500 to 2500 Da or more have been observed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The MOS mixtures were further characterized using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS). In addition to providing well-defined series of positive and negative calibrant ions using either electrospray ionization (ESI) or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), the MOSs are not encumbered by memory effects and, thus, are well-suited mass calibration and instrument tuning standards for carbohydrate analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalAnalytical Biochemistry
Volume381
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2008

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Electrospray ionization
Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Calibration
Ionization
Mass spectrometry
Desorption
Mass Spectrometry
Lasers
Ions
Data storage equipment
Tuning
Cyclotrons
Beer
Cyclotron resonance
Liquid chromatography
Fourier Analysis
Oligosaccharides
Liquid Chromatography
Isomers
Fourier transforms

Keywords

  • Electrospray ionization
  • Infrared multiphoton dissociation
  • Mass calibration
  • Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization
  • Oligosaccharide
  • Porous-graphitized carbon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Dual polarity accurate mass calibration for electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using maltooligosaccharides. / Clowers, Brian H.; Dodds, Eric D.; Seipert, Richard R.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

In: Analytical Biochemistry, Vol. 381, No. 2, 15.10.2008, p. 205-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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