DTC genetic testing and consumer comprehension

Scott Mcgrath, Dhundy Bastola

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Personal genetic tests first emerged in the consumer marketplace in 2006. Classified as Direct-To-Consumer (DTC) genetic testing, companies participating in this market enabled customers to buy tests online without doctor involvement. Customers of the DTC company 23andMe were invited to participate in an online survey to determine if the exclusion of medical professionals impacted customers' abilities to interpret and comprehend test results. DTC customers were asked to interpret the results of two mock test cases, where results were translated into disease probability for an individual compared to the public. When asked to evaluate the risk, only 23.8% of those surveyed were able to interpret both the cases correctly. Participants who took time to read the provided supplemental material were 3.93 times (p = .040) more likely to correctly interpret both test results than those who did not. The odds for correctly answering both cases were 3.289 times (p = .011) higher for those who made > $50k than those who made less. As the market for DTCs expands, correct interpretations will become more critical. Involving more health professionals may be needed to ensure high levels of comprehension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages582-583
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781450328944
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 20 2014
Event5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics, ACM BCB 2014 - Newport Beach, United States
Duration: Sep 20 2014Sep 23 2014

Publication series

NameACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics

Conference

Conference5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics, ACM BCB 2014
CountryUnited States
CityNewport Beach
Period9/20/149/23/14

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Genetic Testing
Health
Testing
Industry
Surveys and Questionnaires
Direct-To-Consumer Screening and Testing

Keywords

  • 23andme
  • Comprehension
  • Direct-to-consumer genetic test
  • Personalized medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Software
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Mcgrath, S., & Bastola, D. (2014). DTC genetic testing and consumer comprehension. In ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics (pp. 582-583). (ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/2649387.2660559

DTC genetic testing and consumer comprehension. / Mcgrath, Scott; Bastola, Dhundy.

ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2014. p. 582-583 (ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mcgrath, S & Bastola, D 2014, DTC genetic testing and consumer comprehension. in ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics. ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 582-583, 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics, ACM BCB 2014, Newport Beach, United States, 9/20/14. https://doi.org/10.1145/2649387.2660559
Mcgrath S, Bastola D. DTC genetic testing and consumer comprehension. In ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2014. p. 582-583. (ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics). https://doi.org/10.1145/2649387.2660559
Mcgrath, Scott ; Bastola, Dhundy. / DTC genetic testing and consumer comprehension. ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2014. pp. 582-583 (ACM BCB 2014 - 5th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics).
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