Driver education and teen crashes and traffic violations in the first two years of driving in a graduated licensing system

Duane F. Shell, Ian M. Newman, Ana Lucía Córdova-Cazar, Jill M. Heese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract Our primary research question was whether teens obtaining their intermediate-level provisional operators permit (POP) in a graduated driver licensing (GDL) environment through driver education differed in crashes and traffic violations from teens who obtained their POP by completing a supervised driving certification log without taking driver education. A descriptive epidemiological study examining a census of all teen drivers in Nebraska (151,880 teens, 48.6% girls, 51.4% boys) during an eight year period from 2003 to 2010 was conducted. The driver education cohort had significantly fewer crashes, injury or fatal crashes, violations, and alcohol-related violations than the certification log cohort in both years one and two of driving following receipt of the POP. Hierarchical logistic regression was conducted, controlling for gender, race/ethnicity, median household income, urban-rural residence, and age receiving the POP. In both year one and two of driving, teens in the certification log cohort had higher odds of a crash, injury or fatal crash, violation, or alcohol-related violation. Findings support that relative to a supervised driving certification log approach, teens taking driver education are less likely to be involved in crashes or to receive a traffic violation during their first two years of driving in an intermediate stage in a graduated driver licensing system. Because teen crash and fatality rates are highest at ages 16-18, these reductions are especially meaningful. Driver education appears to make a difference in teen traffic outcomes at a time when risk is highest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3823
Pages (from-to)45-52
Number of pages8
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume82
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2015

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Licensure
Education
driver
traffic
Driver licensing
Certification
certification
education
Alcohols
alcohol
Logistics
Wounds and Injuries
Censuses
household income
Epidemiologic Studies
census
ethnicity
Logistic Models
logistics
regression

Keywords

  • Crash
  • Driver education
  • Graduated driver licensing
  • Injury outcome
  • Traffic violations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Driver education and teen crashes and traffic violations in the first two years of driving in a graduated licensing system. / Shell, Duane F.; Newman, Ian M.; Córdova-Cazar, Ana Lucía; Heese, Jill M.

In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 82, 3823, 03.06.2015, p. 45-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shell, Duane F. ; Newman, Ian M. ; Córdova-Cazar, Ana Lucía ; Heese, Jill M. / Driver education and teen crashes and traffic violations in the first two years of driving in a graduated licensing system. In: Accident Analysis and Prevention. 2015 ; Vol. 82. pp. 45-52.
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