Dose-intensive ifosfamide for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who either fail to achieve or relapse following an initial complete remission have a poor prognosis with conventional salvage chemotherapy. Patients with chemotherapy-sensitive NHL have a 45% chance of long-term disease-free survival with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Patients with chemotherapy-resistant NHL have a significantly reduced chance of long-term disease-free survival. Ifosfamide, a synthetic analogue of cyclophosphamide, has been evaluated in a few small trials of high-dose chemotherapy and ABMT in lymphoma. Because of their clinical synergy, ifosfamide has been combined with carboplatin and etoposide (ICE) and given with ABMT in several phase I/II dose-escalating studies. Maximum tolerated doses of the ICE regimen in these trials are 16 to 20.1 g/m2 ifosfamide, 1.8 g/m2 carboplatin, and 1.2 to 3.0 g/m2 etoposide. Renal, central nervous system, and cardiac toxicities have precluded further dose escalation. Sequential dosing protocols, administration of high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support, and other approaches, possibly combining current treatment options, may be necessary to further improve the long-term survival of patients with relapsed NHL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in Oncology
Volume23
Issue number3 SUPPL. 6
StatePublished - Aug 1 1996

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Ifosfamide
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Drug Therapy
Autologous Transplantation
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Carboplatin
Etoposide
Disease-Free Survival
Therapeutics
Maximum Tolerated Dose
Cyclophosphamide
Lymphoma
Blood Cells
Stem Cells
Central Nervous System
Kidney
Recurrence
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Dose-intensive ifosfamide for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. / Vose, Julie Marie.

In: Seminars in Oncology, Vol. 23, No. 3 SUPPL. 6, 01.08.1996, p. 33-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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