Domestic Global Health: A Curriculum Teaching Medical Students to Evaluate Refugee Asylum Seekers and Torture Survivors

Ramin Asgary, Pamela Saenger, Loretta Jophlin, Delia C. Burnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Seven to 12% of foreign-born patients in the United States has experienced torture. We aimed to teach medical students to identify and care for asylum seekers/torture survivors. Description: One hundred twenty-five students participated in a program consisting of a workshop covering sequelae of torture, asylum law, and an approach to patient evaluation; twice-monthly clinical sessions; and mentored preparation of medical affidavits. We observed clinical encounters; evaluated medical affidavits; and assessed students' knowledge, attitudes, and skills pre- and postcurriculum. Evaluation: Students successfully performed physical and psychological evaluations and prepared affidavits resulting in 89% asylum application approval. We observed improvement in student attitudes toward working with survivors (p <.05), knowledge of sequelae of torture (p <.001), and self-efficacy in clinical evaluation (p <.001). Conclusions: Medical students learned necessary skills to provide services for survivors, which will also serve them in caring for other vulnerable populations. As an advocacy, cultural competency, and domestic global health opportunity, this training was feasible and achieved its educational goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-357
Number of pages10
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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asylum seeker
torture
refugee
medical student
curriculum
Teaching
health
evaluation
student
training opportunities
self-efficacy
Law

Keywords

  • asylum seeker
  • curriculum
  • global health
  • medical student
  • torture survivors
  • training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Domestic Global Health : A Curriculum Teaching Medical Students to Evaluate Refugee Asylum Seekers and Torture Survivors. / Asgary, Ramin; Saenger, Pamela; Jophlin, Loretta; Burnett, Delia C.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.10.2013, p. 348-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asgary, Ramin ; Saenger, Pamela ; Jophlin, Loretta ; Burnett, Delia C. / Domestic Global Health : A Curriculum Teaching Medical Students to Evaluate Refugee Asylum Seekers and Torture Survivors. In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 348-357.
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