Does longer life mean better health? Not for native-born mexican americans in the health and retirement survey

Mark D. Hayward, David F. Warner, Eileen M. Crimmins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Race/ethnic differences in mortality constitute a fundamental form of inequality in the United States. Black Americans live fewer years than whites, and the disadvantage for blacks in chances for long life is a long-term historical pattern. National mortality estimates for Hispanics show that longevity of individuals in this group is equivalent to and sometimes exceeds those for whites, despite Hispanics' stark socioeconomic disadvantages (National Center for Health Statistics 2001). Trend data for Hispanics spanning several decades are not available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Health of Aging Hispanics
Subtitle of host publicationThe Mexican-Origin Population
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages85-95
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)0387472061, 9780387472065
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Hayward, M. D., Warner, D. F., & Crimmins, E. M. (2007). Does longer life mean better health? Not for native-born mexican americans in the health and retirement survey. In The Health of Aging Hispanics: The Mexican-Origin Population (pp. 85-95). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-47208-9_7