Does Hospital Volume Affect Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery?

Jonathan L. Hatch, Michael J. Bauschard, Shaun A. Nguyen, Paul R. Lambert, Ted A. Meyer, Theodore R. McRackan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:To determine the effect of hospital surgical case volume on the outcomes of vestibular schwannoma surgery.Study Design:Retrospective case review.Setting:University HealthSystem Consortium member hospitals (includes nearly every US academic medical center).Patients:Three thousand six hundred ninety-seven patients who underwent vestibular schwannoma resection over a 3-year timespan (2012-2015) grouped by race, age, comorbidities, payer, and sex.Intervention:Surgical resection of vestibular schwannoma.Main Outcome Measures:Morbidity and mortality following vestibular schwannoma excision are compared by hospital volume (low, medium, and high) including deciles.Results:There was significantly longer length of stay (p ≤ 0.005) among groups with low-volume hospitals followed by medium-volume hospitals and high-volume hospitals. Low-volume hospitals had a significantly higher rate of complications including stroke, aspiration, and respiratory failure (p ≤ 0.0175). Patient characteristics of age, sex, sex, and baseline comorbidities were similar between hospital groups. However, patients at high-volume hospitals were more likely to be Caucasian (83.1%, p = 0.0001) and have private insurance (76.7%, p < 0.0001). There was a strong negative correlation between complication rates and hospital volume (r =-0.8164, p = 0.0040).Conclusion:The volume of vestibular schwannoma surgeries performed at a hospital impacts length of stay and rates of postoperative complications. Demographics among hospital groups were similar though high-volume hospitals had significantly more patients who were privately insured and Caucasian.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)481-487
Number of pages7
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Acoustic Neuroma
High-Volume Hospitals
Low-Volume Hospitals
Comorbidity
Length of Stay
Insurance
Sex Characteristics
Respiratory Insufficiency
Retrospective Studies
Stroke
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Acoustic neuroma
  • Clinical effectiveness research
  • Clinical outcomes
  • Database research
  • Surgical volume
  • Vestibular schwannoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Does Hospital Volume Affect Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery? / Hatch, Jonathan L.; Bauschard, Michael J.; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Lambert, Paul R.; Meyer, Ted A.; McRackan, Theodore R.

In: Otology and Neurotology, Vol. 39, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 481-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hatch, Jonathan L. ; Bauschard, Michael J. ; Nguyen, Shaun A. ; Lambert, Paul R. ; Meyer, Ted A. ; McRackan, Theodore R. / Does Hospital Volume Affect Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery?. In: Otology and Neurotology. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 4. pp. 481-487.
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abstract = "Objective:To determine the effect of hospital surgical case volume on the outcomes of vestibular schwannoma surgery.Study Design:Retrospective case review.Setting:University HealthSystem Consortium member hospitals (includes nearly every US academic medical center).Patients:Three thousand six hundred ninety-seven patients who underwent vestibular schwannoma resection over a 3-year timespan (2012-2015) grouped by race, age, comorbidities, payer, and sex.Intervention:Surgical resection of vestibular schwannoma.Main Outcome Measures:Morbidity and mortality following vestibular schwannoma excision are compared by hospital volume (low, medium, and high) including deciles.Results:There was significantly longer length of stay (p ≤ 0.005) among groups with low-volume hospitals followed by medium-volume hospitals and high-volume hospitals. Low-volume hospitals had a significantly higher rate of complications including stroke, aspiration, and respiratory failure (p ≤ 0.0175). Patient characteristics of age, sex, sex, and baseline comorbidities were similar between hospital groups. However, patients at high-volume hospitals were more likely to be Caucasian (83.1{\%}, p = 0.0001) and have private insurance (76.7{\%}, p < 0.0001). There was a strong negative correlation between complication rates and hospital volume (r =-0.8164, p = 0.0040).Conclusion:The volume of vestibular schwannoma surgeries performed at a hospital impacts length of stay and rates of postoperative complications. Demographics among hospital groups were similar though high-volume hospitals had significantly more patients who were privately insured and Caucasian.",
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