Does footwear affect ankle coordination strategies?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis of this study was that shoe hardness and footwear affect ankle coordinative strategies during the running stance period. Subjects ran at a self-selected pace under three conditions - barefoot, wearing a hard shoe, and wearing a soft shoe - while sagittal and frontal view kinematic data were collected. Dynamic systems theory tools were used to explore ankle coordinative strategies under the three conditions. No significant differences in coordination were found between the two shoe conditions. However, significant differences in ankle coordinative strategies existed between the shoe conditions and the barefoot condition. Changes in coordinative strategies may be related to different mechanisms to attenuate impact forces while running barefoot.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-58
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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Shoes
Ankle
Systems Theory
Hardness
Biomechanical Phenomena

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Podiatry
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Does footwear affect ankle coordination strategies? / Kurz, Max J; Stergiou, Nicholas.

In: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, Vol. 94, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 53-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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