Does Difference in Physical Activity Between Blacks and Whites Vary by Sex, Income, Education, and Region of Residence? Results from 2008 to 2017 National Health Interview Surveys

Mohammad Siahpush, Regina E. Robbins, Athena K Ramos, Tzeyu L. Michaud, Martina A. Clarke, Keyonna M. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine how the effect of race (Black versus White) on meeting physical activity (PA) guidelines varies by sex, income, education, and region of residence. Methods: We pooled data from 10 consecutive years (2008 to 2017) of the National Health Interview Survey. We used logistic regression to assess the extent to which the effect of race on meeting the U.S. federal guidelines for PA varies by sex, income, education, and region, after controlling for several health-related variables. The analysis sample size was 225,600 (102,348 men and 123,252 women). Results: Race and most of the other covariates interacted with sex in their effect on meeting PA guidelines; therefore, separate models for men and women were estimated. In each model, race interacted with income and region, but not with education. Among men, Blacks were more likely to meet PA guidelines than Whites in nearly all income categories and regions. The race effect was weakest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Among women, Blacks were generally less likely than Whites to meet the guidelines and the race effect was largest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Conclusion: This study showed that the difference between Blacks and Whites in the extent to which they adhere to federal PA guidelines varies by sex, income, and region of residence. Black women whole live below the poverty threshold are less likely than other demographic groups to meet the PA guidelines. Targeted interventions to promote PA among this population group are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)883-891
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Sex Education
Health Surveys
Guidelines
Interviews
Exercise
income
interview
health
education
population group
Poverty
hydroquinone
Population Groups
Sample Size
Logistic Models
logistics
Demography
poverty
Education
regression

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Health disparities
  • Physical activity
  • Physical activity guidelines
  • Racial health disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Does Difference in Physical Activity Between Blacks and Whites Vary by Sex, Income, Education, and Region of Residence? Results from 2008 to 2017 National Health Interview Surveys. / Siahpush, Mohammad; Robbins, Regina E.; Ramos, Athena K; Michaud, Tzeyu L.; Clarke, Martina A.; King, Keyonna M.

In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, Vol. 6, No. 5, 01.10.2019, p. 883-891.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5cee53c176b847e69c433f63c365de44,
title = "Does Difference in Physical Activity Between Blacks and Whites Vary by Sex, Income, Education, and Region of Residence? Results from 2008 to 2017 National Health Interview Surveys",
abstract = "Objective: To examine how the effect of race (Black versus White) on meeting physical activity (PA) guidelines varies by sex, income, education, and region of residence. Methods: We pooled data from 10 consecutive years (2008 to 2017) of the National Health Interview Survey. We used logistic regression to assess the extent to which the effect of race on meeting the U.S. federal guidelines for PA varies by sex, income, education, and region, after controlling for several health-related variables. The analysis sample size was 225,600 (102,348 men and 123,252 women). Results: Race and most of the other covariates interacted with sex in their effect on meeting PA guidelines; therefore, separate models for men and women were estimated. In each model, race interacted with income and region, but not with education. Among men, Blacks were more likely to meet PA guidelines than Whites in nearly all income categories and regions. The race effect was weakest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Among women, Blacks were generally less likely than Whites to meet the guidelines and the race effect was largest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Conclusion: This study showed that the difference between Blacks and Whites in the extent to which they adhere to federal PA guidelines varies by sex, income, and region of residence. Black women whole live below the poverty threshold are less likely than other demographic groups to meet the PA guidelines. Targeted interventions to promote PA among this population group are warranted.",
keywords = "African Americans, Health disparities, Physical activity, Physical activity guidelines, Racial health disparities",
author = "Mohammad Siahpush and Robbins, {Regina E.} and Ramos, {Athena K} and Michaud, {Tzeyu L.} and Clarke, {Martina A.} and King, {Keyonna M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s40615-019-00586-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "883--891",
journal = "Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities",
issn = "2197-3792",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Difference in Physical Activity Between Blacks and Whites Vary by Sex, Income, Education, and Region of Residence? Results from 2008 to 2017 National Health Interview Surveys

AU - Siahpush, Mohammad

AU - Robbins, Regina E.

AU - Ramos, Athena K

AU - Michaud, Tzeyu L.

AU - Clarke, Martina A.

AU - King, Keyonna M.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Objective: To examine how the effect of race (Black versus White) on meeting physical activity (PA) guidelines varies by sex, income, education, and region of residence. Methods: We pooled data from 10 consecutive years (2008 to 2017) of the National Health Interview Survey. We used logistic regression to assess the extent to which the effect of race on meeting the U.S. federal guidelines for PA varies by sex, income, education, and region, after controlling for several health-related variables. The analysis sample size was 225,600 (102,348 men and 123,252 women). Results: Race and most of the other covariates interacted with sex in their effect on meeting PA guidelines; therefore, separate models for men and women were estimated. In each model, race interacted with income and region, but not with education. Among men, Blacks were more likely to meet PA guidelines than Whites in nearly all income categories and regions. The race effect was weakest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Among women, Blacks were generally less likely than Whites to meet the guidelines and the race effect was largest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Conclusion: This study showed that the difference between Blacks and Whites in the extent to which they adhere to federal PA guidelines varies by sex, income, and region of residence. Black women whole live below the poverty threshold are less likely than other demographic groups to meet the PA guidelines. Targeted interventions to promote PA among this population group are warranted.

AB - Objective: To examine how the effect of race (Black versus White) on meeting physical activity (PA) guidelines varies by sex, income, education, and region of residence. Methods: We pooled data from 10 consecutive years (2008 to 2017) of the National Health Interview Survey. We used logistic regression to assess the extent to which the effect of race on meeting the U.S. federal guidelines for PA varies by sex, income, education, and region, after controlling for several health-related variables. The analysis sample size was 225,600 (102,348 men and 123,252 women). Results: Race and most of the other covariates interacted with sex in their effect on meeting PA guidelines; therefore, separate models for men and women were estimated. In each model, race interacted with income and region, but not with education. Among men, Blacks were more likely to meet PA guidelines than Whites in nearly all income categories and regions. The race effect was weakest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Among women, Blacks were generally less likely than Whites to meet the guidelines and the race effect was largest among the poor and in the Northeast region. Conclusion: This study showed that the difference between Blacks and Whites in the extent to which they adhere to federal PA guidelines varies by sex, income, and region of residence. Black women whole live below the poverty threshold are less likely than other demographic groups to meet the PA guidelines. Targeted interventions to promote PA among this population group are warranted.

KW - African Americans

KW - Health disparities

KW - Physical activity

KW - Physical activity guidelines

KW - Racial health disparities

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072056521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85072056521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40615-019-00586-9

DO - 10.1007/s40615-019-00586-9

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 883

EP - 891

JO - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities

JF - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities

SN - 2197-3792

IS - 5

ER -