Do perceptions of hiring criteria differ for sales managers and sales representatives? Implications for marketing education

Mary Anne Raymond, Leslie C Carlson, Christopher D. Hopkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, this study explores whether perceptions of critical hiring criteria for entry-level sales positions differ across sales managers and sales representatives. This research also examines which classroom activities and skills these individuals perceive to be most important for strengthening the desired skill set and whether an MBA degree is an added advantage when candidates are being considered for entry-level sales positions. Results indicate that managers believe objective assessment, technical skills, experiential learning, acquired skills, college accomplishments, and extracurricular activities are more important than do sales representatives. Sales representatives deem basic skills, educational experiences, and interactive skills as more important than how managers assess these skills and attributes. Neither group believes that having an MBA is a necessary prerequisite for these positions. Recommendations for marketing educators are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-55
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Marketing Education
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

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sales representative
hiring
sales
entry level
marketing
manager
education
quantitative method
qualitative method
candidacy
educator
classroom
learning
Sales manager
Hiring
Marketing education
experience
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Marketing

Cite this

Do perceptions of hiring criteria differ for sales managers and sales representatives? Implications for marketing education. / Raymond, Mary Anne; Carlson, Leslie C; Hopkins, Christopher D.

In: Journal of Marketing Education, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.04.2006, p. 43-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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