Distinct neural mechanisms underlying acute and repeated administration of antipsychotic drugs in rat avoidance conditioning

Ming Li, Tao Sun, Chen Zhang, Gang Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Acute antipsychotic treatment disrupts conditioned avoidance responding, and repeated treatment induces a sensitization- or tolerance-like effect. However, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying both acute and repeated antipsychotic effects remain to be determined. Objective: The present study examined the neuroreceptor mechanisms of haloperidol, clozapine, and olanzapine effect in a rat two-way conditioned avoidance model. Methods: Well-trained Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with haloperidol (0.05 mg/kg, sc), clozapine (10.0 mg/kg, sc), or olanzapine (1.0 mg/kg, sc) together with either saline, quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2/3 agonist, 1.0 mg/kg, sc), or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amphetamine (DOI; a selective 5-HT2A/2C agonist, 2.5 mg/kg, sc), and their conditioned avoidance responses were tested over 3 days. After 2 days of drug-free retraining, the repeated treatment effect was assessed in a challenge test. Results: Pretreatment of quinpirole, but not DOI, attenuated the acute haloperidol-induced disruption of avoidance responding and to a lesser extent, olanzapine-induced disruption. In contrast, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the acute effect of clozapine. On the repeated effect, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the potentiated disruption of haloperidol, whereas pretreatment of quinpirole attenuated the potentiated disruption of olanzapine but enhanced the tolerance-like effect of clozapine. Conclusions: These findings suggest that acute haloperidol and olanzapine disrupt avoidance responding primarily by blocking dopamine D2 receptors, whereas acute clozapine exerts its disruptive effect primarily by blocking the 5-HT2A receptors. The repeated haloperidol effect may be mediated by 5-HT2A/2C blockade-initiated neural processes, whereas the repeated clozapine and olanzapine effect may be mediated by D2/3 blockade-initiated neural processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-57
Number of pages13
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume212
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

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olanzapine
Clozapine
Quinpirole
Haloperidol
Antipsychotic Agents
Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptor Agonists
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Sensory Receptor Cells
Amphetamine
Sprague Dawley Rats
Dopamine

Keywords

  • 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo- amphetamine
  • Clozapine
  • Conditioned avoidance response
  • Haloperidol
  • Olanzapine
  • Quinpirole
  • Repeated antipsychotic treatment
  • Sensitization
  • Tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Distinct neural mechanisms underlying acute and repeated administration of antipsychotic drugs in rat avoidance conditioning. / Li, Ming; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Chen; Hu, Gang.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 212, No. 1, 01.09.2010, p. 45-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Rationale: Acute antipsychotic treatment disrupts conditioned avoidance responding, and repeated treatment induces a sensitization- or tolerance-like effect. However, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying both acute and repeated antipsychotic effects remain to be determined. Objective: The present study examined the neuroreceptor mechanisms of haloperidol, clozapine, and olanzapine effect in a rat two-way conditioned avoidance model. Methods: Well-trained Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with haloperidol (0.05 mg/kg, sc), clozapine (10.0 mg/kg, sc), or olanzapine (1.0 mg/kg, sc) together with either saline, quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2/3 agonist, 1.0 mg/kg, sc), or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amphetamine (DOI; a selective 5-HT2A/2C agonist, 2.5 mg/kg, sc), and their conditioned avoidance responses were tested over 3 days. After 2 days of drug-free retraining, the repeated treatment effect was assessed in a challenge test. Results: Pretreatment of quinpirole, but not DOI, attenuated the acute haloperidol-induced disruption of avoidance responding and to a lesser extent, olanzapine-induced disruption. In contrast, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the acute effect of clozapine. On the repeated effect, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the potentiated disruption of haloperidol, whereas pretreatment of quinpirole attenuated the potentiated disruption of olanzapine but enhanced the tolerance-like effect of clozapine. Conclusions: These findings suggest that acute haloperidol and olanzapine disrupt avoidance responding primarily by blocking dopamine D2 receptors, whereas acute clozapine exerts its disruptive effect primarily by blocking the 5-HT2A receptors. The repeated haloperidol effect may be mediated by 5-HT2A/2C blockade-initiated neural processes, whereas the repeated clozapine and olanzapine effect may be mediated by D2/3 blockade-initiated neural processes.",
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AU - Sun, Tao

AU - Zhang, Chen

AU - Hu, Gang

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N2 - Rationale: Acute antipsychotic treatment disrupts conditioned avoidance responding, and repeated treatment induces a sensitization- or tolerance-like effect. However, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying both acute and repeated antipsychotic effects remain to be determined. Objective: The present study examined the neuroreceptor mechanisms of haloperidol, clozapine, and olanzapine effect in a rat two-way conditioned avoidance model. Methods: Well-trained Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with haloperidol (0.05 mg/kg, sc), clozapine (10.0 mg/kg, sc), or olanzapine (1.0 mg/kg, sc) together with either saline, quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2/3 agonist, 1.0 mg/kg, sc), or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amphetamine (DOI; a selective 5-HT2A/2C agonist, 2.5 mg/kg, sc), and their conditioned avoidance responses were tested over 3 days. After 2 days of drug-free retraining, the repeated treatment effect was assessed in a challenge test. Results: Pretreatment of quinpirole, but not DOI, attenuated the acute haloperidol-induced disruption of avoidance responding and to a lesser extent, olanzapine-induced disruption. In contrast, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the acute effect of clozapine. On the repeated effect, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the potentiated disruption of haloperidol, whereas pretreatment of quinpirole attenuated the potentiated disruption of olanzapine but enhanced the tolerance-like effect of clozapine. Conclusions: These findings suggest that acute haloperidol and olanzapine disrupt avoidance responding primarily by blocking dopamine D2 receptors, whereas acute clozapine exerts its disruptive effect primarily by blocking the 5-HT2A receptors. The repeated haloperidol effect may be mediated by 5-HT2A/2C blockade-initiated neural processes, whereas the repeated clozapine and olanzapine effect may be mediated by D2/3 blockade-initiated neural processes.

AB - Rationale: Acute antipsychotic treatment disrupts conditioned avoidance responding, and repeated treatment induces a sensitization- or tolerance-like effect. However, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying both acute and repeated antipsychotic effects remain to be determined. Objective: The present study examined the neuroreceptor mechanisms of haloperidol, clozapine, and olanzapine effect in a rat two-way conditioned avoidance model. Methods: Well-trained Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with haloperidol (0.05 mg/kg, sc), clozapine (10.0 mg/kg, sc), or olanzapine (1.0 mg/kg, sc) together with either saline, quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2/3 agonist, 1.0 mg/kg, sc), or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amphetamine (DOI; a selective 5-HT2A/2C agonist, 2.5 mg/kg, sc), and their conditioned avoidance responses were tested over 3 days. After 2 days of drug-free retraining, the repeated treatment effect was assessed in a challenge test. Results: Pretreatment of quinpirole, but not DOI, attenuated the acute haloperidol-induced disruption of avoidance responding and to a lesser extent, olanzapine-induced disruption. In contrast, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the acute effect of clozapine. On the repeated effect, pretreatment of DOI, but not quinpirole, attenuated the potentiated disruption of haloperidol, whereas pretreatment of quinpirole attenuated the potentiated disruption of olanzapine but enhanced the tolerance-like effect of clozapine. Conclusions: These findings suggest that acute haloperidol and olanzapine disrupt avoidance responding primarily by blocking dopamine D2 receptors, whereas acute clozapine exerts its disruptive effect primarily by blocking the 5-HT2A receptors. The repeated haloperidol effect may be mediated by 5-HT2A/2C blockade-initiated neural processes, whereas the repeated clozapine and olanzapine effect may be mediated by D2/3 blockade-initiated neural processes.

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KW - Sensitization

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