Dissociable neural responses to facial expressions of sadness and anger

R. J.R. Blair, J. S. Morris, C. D. Frith, D. I. Perrett, R. J. Dolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

883 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have investigated the neural substrates which mediate responses to fearful, disgusted and happy expressions. No previous studies have investigated the neural substrates which mediate responses to sad and angry expressions. Using functional neuroimaging, we tested two hypotheses. First, we tested whether the amygdala has a neural response to sad and/or angry facial expressions. Secondly, we tested whether the orbitofrontal cortex has a specific neural response to angry facial expressions. Volunteer subjects were scanned, using PET, while they performed a sex discrimination task involving static grey-scale images of faces expressing varying degrees of sadness and anger. We found that increasing intensity of sad facial expression was associated with enhanced activity in the left amygdala and right temporal pole. In addition, we found that increasing intensity of angry facial expression was associated with enhanced activity in the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex. We found no support for the suggestion that angry expressions generate a signal in the amygdala. The results provide evidence for dissociable, but interlocking, systems for the processing of distinct categories of negative facial expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)883-893
Number of pages11
JournalBrain
Volume122
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1999

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Facial Expression
Anger
Amygdala
Sexism
Functional Neuroimaging
Gyrus Cinguli
Prefrontal Cortex
Neuroimaging
Volunteers

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Anger
  • Facial expression
  • Orbitofrontal cortex
  • Sadness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Blair, R. J. R., Morris, J. S., Frith, C. D., Perrett, D. I., & Dolan, R. J. (1999). Dissociable neural responses to facial expressions of sadness and anger. Brain, 122(5), 883-893. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/122.5.883

Dissociable neural responses to facial expressions of sadness and anger. / Blair, R. J.R.; Morris, J. S.; Frith, C. D.; Perrett, D. I.; Dolan, R. J.

In: Brain, Vol. 122, No. 5, 05.1999, p. 883-893.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blair, RJR, Morris, JS, Frith, CD, Perrett, DI & Dolan, RJ 1999, 'Dissociable neural responses to facial expressions of sadness and anger', Brain, vol. 122, no. 5, pp. 883-893. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/122.5.883
Blair, R. J.R. ; Morris, J. S. ; Frith, C. D. ; Perrett, D. I. ; Dolan, R. J. / Dissociable neural responses to facial expressions of sadness and anger. In: Brain. 1999 ; Vol. 122, No. 5. pp. 883-893.
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