Disruption of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue to the murine fatty acid transport protein impairs uptake and growth on long-chain fatty acids

Nils J. Færgeman, Concetta C. DiRusso, Andrea Elberger, Jens Knudsen, Paul N. Black

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Abstract

The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to utilize exogenous fatty acids for a variety of cellular processes including β-oxidation, phospholipid biosynthesis, and protein modification. The molecular mechanisms that govern the uptake of these compounds in S. cerevisiae have not been described. We report the characterization of FAT1, a gene that encodes a putative membrane-bound long-chain fatty acid transport protein (Fat1p). Fat1p contains 623 amino acid residues that are 33% identical and 54% with similar chemical properties as compared with the fatty acid transport protein FATP described in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (Schaffer and Lodish (1994) Cell 79, 427- 436), suggesting a similar function. Disruption of FAT1 results in 1) an impaired growth in YPD medium containing 25 μM cerulenin and 500 μM fatty acid (myristate (C(14:0)), palmitate (C(16:0)), or oleate (C(18:1))); 2) a marked decrease in the uptake of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid analogue boron dipyrromethene difluoride dodecanoic acid (BODIPY-3823); 3) a reduced rate of exogenous oleate incorporation into phospholipids; and 4) a 2-3-fold decrease in the rates of oleate uptake. These data support the hypothesis that Fat1p is involved in long-chain fatty acid uptake and may represent a long-chain fatty acid transport protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8531-8538
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume272
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 1997

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Fatty Acid Transport Proteins
Yeast
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Fatty Acids
Oleic Acid
lauric acid
Growth
Phospholipids
Cerulenin
Boron
Palmitates
Biosynthesis
Myristic Acid
Protein Biosynthesis
Adipocytes
Chemical properties
Genes
Yeasts
Membranes
Amino Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Disruption of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue to the murine fatty acid transport protein impairs uptake and growth on long-chain fatty acids. / Færgeman, Nils J.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Elberger, Andrea; Knudsen, Jens; Black, Paul N.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 272, No. 13, 28.03.1997, p. 8531-8538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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