Disinfection of selected Aspergillus spp. using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation

Christopher F. Green, Pasquale V. Scarpino, Paul Jensen, Nancy J. Jensen, Shawn G Gibbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: The efficacy of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) and the UVGI dose necessary to inactivate fungal spores on an agar surface for cultures of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus fumigatus were determined. Methods and results: A four-chambered UVGI testing unit with a 9-W, Phillips, low pressure, mercury UVGI lamp in each chamber was used in this study. An aperture was adjusted to provide 50, 100, 150, and 200 μ W/cm2 of uniform flux to the surfaces of the Petri dish, resulting in a total UVGI dose to the surface of the Petri dishes ranging from 12 to 96 mJ/cm2. The UVGI dose necessary to inactivate 90% of the A. flavus and A. fumigatus was 35 and 54 mJ/cm2, respectively. Conclusions: UVGI can be used to inactivate culturable fungal spores. Aspergillus flavus was more susceptible than A. fumigatus to UVGI. Significance and impact of the study: These results may not be directly correlated to the effect of UVGI on airborne fungal spores, but they indicate that current technology may not be efficacious as a supplement to ventilation unless it can provide higher doses of UVGI to kill spores traveling through the irradiated zone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-224
Number of pages4
JournalCanadian journal of microbiology
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

Fingerprint

Aspergillus flavus
Aspergillus fumigatus
Fungal Spores
Aspergillus
Disinfection
Irradiation
Dosimetry
Spores
Mercury
Agar
Ventilation
Technology
Pressure
Electric lamps
Fluxes

Keywords

  • Aspergillus
  • Fungi
  • Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Green, C. F., Scarpino, P. V., Jensen, P., Jensen, N. J., & Gibbs, S. G. (2004). Disinfection of selected Aspergillus spp. using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation. Canadian journal of microbiology, 50(3), 221-224. https://doi.org/10.1139/w04-002

Disinfection of selected Aspergillus spp. using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation. / Green, Christopher F.; Scarpino, Pasquale V.; Jensen, Paul; Jensen, Nancy J.; Gibbs, Shawn G.

In: Canadian journal of microbiology, Vol. 50, No. 3, 01.03.2004, p. 221-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Green, CF, Scarpino, PV, Jensen, P, Jensen, NJ & Gibbs, SG 2004, 'Disinfection of selected Aspergillus spp. using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation', Canadian journal of microbiology, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 221-224. https://doi.org/10.1139/w04-002
Green, Christopher F. ; Scarpino, Pasquale V. ; Jensen, Paul ; Jensen, Nancy J. ; Gibbs, Shawn G. / Disinfection of selected Aspergillus spp. using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation. In: Canadian journal of microbiology. 2004 ; Vol. 50, No. 3. pp. 221-224.
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