Dietary catechin delays tumor onset in a transgenic mouse model

Susan E. Ebeler, Charles A. Brenneman, Gap Soon Kim, William T. Jewell, Michael R. Webb, Leticia Chacon-Rodriguez, Emily A. MacDonald, Amanda C. Cramer, Andrew Levi, John D. Ebeler, Alma Islas-Trejo, Amber Kraus, Steven Heye Hinrichs, Andrew J. Clifford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Evidence exists that red wine, which contains a large array of polyphenols, is protective against cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that catechin, the major monomeric polyphenol in red wine, can delay tumor onset in transgenic mice that spontaneously develop tumors. Design: Mice were fed a nutritionally complete amino acid-based diet supplemented with (+)-catechin (0-8 mmol/kg diet) or alcohol-free solids from red wine. Mice were examined daily; the age at which a first tumor appeared was recorded as the age at tumor onset. Plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations were quantified at the end of the study. Results: Dietary catechin significantly delayed tumor onset; a positive, linear relation was observed between the age at tumor onset and either the amount of dietary catechin (r 2 = 0.761, P < 0.001) or plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations (r 2 = 0.408, P = 0.003). No significant effects on tumor onset were observed when mice consumed a diet supplemented with wine solids containing < 0.22 mmol catechin/kg diet, whereas a previous study showed that wine solids with a similar total polyphenol concentration but containing ≠4 times more catechin significantly delayed tumor onset by ≠30 d compared with a control diet. The catechin composition of the wines is directly related to processing conditions during vinification. Conclusions: Physiologic intakes of specific dietary polyphenols, such as catechin, may play an important role in cancer chemoprevention. Wines have different polyphenol concentrations and compositions; therefore, the overall health benefits of individual wines differ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)865-872
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume76
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

Fingerprint

Catechin
catechin
Transgenic Mice
Wine
animal models
genetically modified organisms
neoplasms
Polyphenols
wines
Neoplasms
polyphenols
Diet
red wines
diet
mice
Age of Onset
metabolites
chemoprevention
Chemoprevention
winemaking

Keywords

  • Amino acid-based diet
  • Cancer
  • Catechin
  • Transgenic mice
  • Tumor onset
  • Wine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Ebeler, S. E., Brenneman, C. A., Kim, G. S., Jewell, W. T., Webb, M. R., Chacon-Rodriguez, L., ... Clifford, A. J. (2002). Dietary catechin delays tumor onset in a transgenic mouse model. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 76(4), 865-872.

Dietary catechin delays tumor onset in a transgenic mouse model. / Ebeler, Susan E.; Brenneman, Charles A.; Kim, Gap Soon; Jewell, William T.; Webb, Michael R.; Chacon-Rodriguez, Leticia; MacDonald, Emily A.; Cramer, Amanda C.; Levi, Andrew; Ebeler, John D.; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Kraus, Amber; Hinrichs, Steven Heye; Clifford, Andrew J.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 76, No. 4, 01.10.2002, p. 865-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ebeler, SE, Brenneman, CA, Kim, GS, Jewell, WT, Webb, MR, Chacon-Rodriguez, L, MacDonald, EA, Cramer, AC, Levi, A, Ebeler, JD, Islas-Trejo, A, Kraus, A, Hinrichs, SH & Clifford, AJ 2002, 'Dietary catechin delays tumor onset in a transgenic mouse model', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 76, no. 4, pp. 865-872.
Ebeler SE, Brenneman CA, Kim GS, Jewell WT, Webb MR, Chacon-Rodriguez L et al. Dietary catechin delays tumor onset in a transgenic mouse model. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2002 Oct 1;76(4):865-872.
Ebeler, Susan E. ; Brenneman, Charles A. ; Kim, Gap Soon ; Jewell, William T. ; Webb, Michael R. ; Chacon-Rodriguez, Leticia ; MacDonald, Emily A. ; Cramer, Amanda C. ; Levi, Andrew ; Ebeler, John D. ; Islas-Trejo, Alma ; Kraus, Amber ; Hinrichs, Steven Heye ; Clifford, Andrew J. / Dietary catechin delays tumor onset in a transgenic mouse model. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2002 ; Vol. 76, No. 4. pp. 865-872.
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title = "Dietary catechin delays tumor onset in a transgenic mouse model",
abstract = "Background: Evidence exists that red wine, which contains a large array of polyphenols, is protective against cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that catechin, the major monomeric polyphenol in red wine, can delay tumor onset in transgenic mice that spontaneously develop tumors. Design: Mice were fed a nutritionally complete amino acid-based diet supplemented with (+)-catechin (0-8 mmol/kg diet) or alcohol-free solids from red wine. Mice were examined daily; the age at which a first tumor appeared was recorded as the age at tumor onset. Plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations were quantified at the end of the study. Results: Dietary catechin significantly delayed tumor onset; a positive, linear relation was observed between the age at tumor onset and either the amount of dietary catechin (r 2 = 0.761, P < 0.001) or plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations (r 2 = 0.408, P = 0.003). No significant effects on tumor onset were observed when mice consumed a diet supplemented with wine solids containing < 0.22 mmol catechin/kg diet, whereas a previous study showed that wine solids with a similar total polyphenol concentration but containing ≠4 times more catechin significantly delayed tumor onset by ≠30 d compared with a control diet. The catechin composition of the wines is directly related to processing conditions during vinification. Conclusions: Physiologic intakes of specific dietary polyphenols, such as catechin, may play an important role in cancer chemoprevention. Wines have different polyphenol concentrations and compositions; therefore, the overall health benefits of individual wines differ.",
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AU - Ebeler, Susan E.

AU - Brenneman, Charles A.

AU - Kim, Gap Soon

AU - Jewell, William T.

AU - Webb, Michael R.

AU - Chacon-Rodriguez, Leticia

AU - MacDonald, Emily A.

AU - Cramer, Amanda C.

AU - Levi, Andrew

AU - Ebeler, John D.

AU - Islas-Trejo, Alma

AU - Kraus, Amber

AU - Hinrichs, Steven Heye

AU - Clifford, Andrew J.

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N2 - Background: Evidence exists that red wine, which contains a large array of polyphenols, is protective against cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that catechin, the major monomeric polyphenol in red wine, can delay tumor onset in transgenic mice that spontaneously develop tumors. Design: Mice were fed a nutritionally complete amino acid-based diet supplemented with (+)-catechin (0-8 mmol/kg diet) or alcohol-free solids from red wine. Mice were examined daily; the age at which a first tumor appeared was recorded as the age at tumor onset. Plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations were quantified at the end of the study. Results: Dietary catechin significantly delayed tumor onset; a positive, linear relation was observed between the age at tumor onset and either the amount of dietary catechin (r 2 = 0.761, P < 0.001) or plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations (r 2 = 0.408, P = 0.003). No significant effects on tumor onset were observed when mice consumed a diet supplemented with wine solids containing < 0.22 mmol catechin/kg diet, whereas a previous study showed that wine solids with a similar total polyphenol concentration but containing ≠4 times more catechin significantly delayed tumor onset by ≠30 d compared with a control diet. The catechin composition of the wines is directly related to processing conditions during vinification. Conclusions: Physiologic intakes of specific dietary polyphenols, such as catechin, may play an important role in cancer chemoprevention. Wines have different polyphenol concentrations and compositions; therefore, the overall health benefits of individual wines differ.

AB - Background: Evidence exists that red wine, which contains a large array of polyphenols, is protective against cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that catechin, the major monomeric polyphenol in red wine, can delay tumor onset in transgenic mice that spontaneously develop tumors. Design: Mice were fed a nutritionally complete amino acid-based diet supplemented with (+)-catechin (0-8 mmol/kg diet) or alcohol-free solids from red wine. Mice were examined daily; the age at which a first tumor appeared was recorded as the age at tumor onset. Plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations were quantified at the end of the study. Results: Dietary catechin significantly delayed tumor onset; a positive, linear relation was observed between the age at tumor onset and either the amount of dietary catechin (r 2 = 0.761, P < 0.001) or plasma catechin and metabolite concentrations (r 2 = 0.408, P = 0.003). No significant effects on tumor onset were observed when mice consumed a diet supplemented with wine solids containing < 0.22 mmol catechin/kg diet, whereas a previous study showed that wine solids with a similar total polyphenol concentration but containing ≠4 times more catechin significantly delayed tumor onset by ≠30 d compared with a control diet. The catechin composition of the wines is directly related to processing conditions during vinification. Conclusions: Physiologic intakes of specific dietary polyphenols, such as catechin, may play an important role in cancer chemoprevention. Wines have different polyphenol concentrations and compositions; therefore, the overall health benefits of individual wines differ.

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KW - Tumor onset

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