Dexmedetomidine and the reduction of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery

José R. Maldonado, Ashley Wysong, Pieter J.A. Van Der Starre, Thaddeus Block, Craig Miller, Bruce A. Reitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

259 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Delirium is a neurobehavioral syndrome caused by the transient disruption of normal neuronal activity secondary to systemic disturbances. Objective: The authors investigated the effects of postoperative sedation on the development of delirium in patients undergoing cardiac-valve procedures. Methods: Patients underwent elective cardiac surgery with a standardized intraoperative anesthesia protocol, followed by random assignment to one of three postoperative sedation protocols: dexmedetomidine, propofol, or midazolam. Results: The incidence of delirium for patients receiving dexmedetomidine was 3%, for those receiving propofol was 50%, and for patients receiving midazolam, 50%. Patients who developed postoperative delirium experienced significantly longer intensive-care stays and longer total hospitalization. Conclusion: The findings of this open-label, randomized clinical investigation suggest that postoperative sedation with dexmedetomidine was associated with significantly lower rates of postoperative delirium and lower care costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-217
Number of pages12
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Dexmedetomidine
Delirium
Thoracic Surgery
Midazolam
Propofol
Heart Valves
Critical Care
Hospitalization
Anesthesia
Surgery
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Maldonado, J. R., Wysong, A., Van Der Starre, P. J. A., Block, T., Miller, C., & Reitz, B. A. (2009). Dexmedetomidine and the reduction of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. Psychosomatics, 50(3), 206-217. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.psy.50.3.206

Dexmedetomidine and the reduction of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. / Maldonado, José R.; Wysong, Ashley; Van Der Starre, Pieter J.A.; Block, Thaddeus; Miller, Craig; Reitz, Bruce A.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 50, No. 3, 01.01.2009, p. 206-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maldonado, JR, Wysong, A, Van Der Starre, PJA, Block, T, Miller, C & Reitz, BA 2009, 'Dexmedetomidine and the reduction of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery', Psychosomatics, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 206-217. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.psy.50.3.206
Maldonado, José R. ; Wysong, Ashley ; Van Der Starre, Pieter J.A. ; Block, Thaddeus ; Miller, Craig ; Reitz, Bruce A. / Dexmedetomidine and the reduction of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. In: Psychosomatics. 2009 ; Vol. 50, No. 3. pp. 206-217.
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