Development of microcolumn-based one-site immunometric assays for protein biomarkers

Erika L. Pfaunmiller, Jeanethe A. Anguizola, Mitchell L. Milanuk, Efthimia Papastavros, Na Tasha Carter, Ryan Matsuda, Xiwei Zheng, David S. Hage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One-site immunometric assays that utilize affinity microcolumns were developed and evaluated for the analysis of protein biomarkers. This approach used labeled antibodies that were monitored through on-line fluorescence or near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence detection. Human serum albumin (HSA) was utilized as a model target protein for this approach. In these assays, a fixed amount of labeled anti-HSA antibodies was mixed with samples or standards containing HSA, followed by the injection of this mixture onto an HSA microcolumn to remove excess antibodies and detect the non-retained labeled antibodies that were bound to HSA from the sample. The affinity microcolumns were 2.1. mm i.d. ×. 5. mm and contained 8-9. nmol of immobilized HSA. These microcolumns were used from 0.10 to 1.0. mL/min and gave results within 35. s to 2.8. min of sample injection. Limits of detection down to 0.10-0.28. ng/mL (1.5-4.2. pM) or 25-30. pg/mL (0.38-0.45. pM) were achieved when using fluorescein or a NIR fluorescent dye as the label, with an assay precision of ±0.1-4.2%. Several parameters were examined during the optimization of these assays, and general guidelines and procedures were developed for the extension of this approach for use with other types of affinity microcolumns and protein biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-100
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Chromatography A
Volume1366
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2014

Fingerprint

Biomarkers
Serum Albumin
Assays
Proteins
Antibodies
Fluorescence
Infrared radiation
Injections
Fluorescein
Fluorescent Dyes
Limit of Detection
Labels
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Affinity microcolumn
  • Chromatographic immunoassay
  • Human serum albumin
  • Near-infrared fluorescence
  • One-site immunometric assay
  • Protein biomarker

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Pfaunmiller, E. L., Anguizola, J. A., Milanuk, M. L., Papastavros, E., Carter, N. T., Matsuda, R., ... Hage, D. S. (2014). Development of microcolumn-based one-site immunometric assays for protein biomarkers. Journal of Chromatography A, 1366, 92-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2014.09.026

Development of microcolumn-based one-site immunometric assays for protein biomarkers. / Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; Anguizola, Jeanethe A.; Milanuk, Mitchell L.; Papastavros, Efthimia; Carter, Na Tasha; Matsuda, Ryan; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S.

In: Journal of Chromatography A, Vol. 1366, 31.10.2014, p. 92-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pfaunmiller, EL, Anguizola, JA, Milanuk, ML, Papastavros, E, Carter, NT, Matsuda, R, Zheng, X & Hage, DS 2014, 'Development of microcolumn-based one-site immunometric assays for protein biomarkers', Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1366, pp. 92-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2014.09.026
Pfaunmiller EL, Anguizola JA, Milanuk ML, Papastavros E, Carter NT, Matsuda R et al. Development of microcolumn-based one-site immunometric assays for protein biomarkers. Journal of Chromatography A. 2014 Oct 31;1366:92-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2014.09.026
Pfaunmiller, Erika L. ; Anguizola, Jeanethe A. ; Milanuk, Mitchell L. ; Papastavros, Efthimia ; Carter, Na Tasha ; Matsuda, Ryan ; Zheng, Xiwei ; Hage, David S. / Development of microcolumn-based one-site immunometric assays for protein biomarkers. In: Journal of Chromatography A. 2014 ; Vol. 1366. pp. 92-100.
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