Development of an Instrument Measuring Perceived Environmental Healthfulness: Behavior Environment Perception Survey (BEPS)

Jade McNamara, Melissa D. Olfert, Morgan Sowers, Sarah Colby, Adrienne White, Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, Kendra Kattelmann, Lisa D. Franzen-Castle, Onikia Brown, Tandalayo Kidd, Karla P. Shelnutt, Tanya Horacek, Geoffrey W. Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To create a tool to measure college students’ perception of the healthfulness of their environment. Design: (1) Item generation, (2) cognitive interview testing and exploratory factor analysis, (3) item refinement/modification, (4) factor structure validation, and (5) criterion validation. Setting: Ten college campuses. Participants: Time point 1 (n = 120 cognitive interviews; n = 922 factor analysis); time point 2 (n = 2,676), convenience sample of undergraduate students. Main Outcome Measures: Cognitive interviews and survey data were used to assess perceptions about the environment. Analysis: Exploratory factor analysis, structural equation confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regressions. Results: Item generation resulted in 93 items. Items were eliminated based on cognitive interviews, exploratory factor analysis of pilot data, and elimination of cross-loading or weak loading items. In confirmatory analyses, a 21-item, 5-factor structure was the best fit for the data (χ2 = 3,286.77, degrees of freedom = 189; comparative fit index = 0.840; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.078). Environmental factors include physical activity (α = 0.68, 4 items), healthful eating (α = 0.86, 5 items), mental health (α = 0.85, 5 items), barriers to healthful eating (α = 0.70, 4 items), and peer influences (α = 0.73, 3 items). There were significant associations between scales and validation criteria (P < .05). Conclusions and Implications: The Behavior Environment Perception Survey is a novel instrument measuring perceptions of the healthfulness of the campus environment. Strengths include a development process involving 10 different universities, strong psychometric properties, and breadth of constructs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Statistical Factor Analysis
Interviews
Eating
Students
Psychometrics
Mental Health
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires
Exercise

Keywords

  • environment, health behavior
  • perception
  • survey methodology
  • young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Development of an Instrument Measuring Perceived Environmental Healthfulness : Behavior Environment Perception Survey (BEPS). / McNamara, Jade; Olfert, Melissa D.; Sowers, Morgan; Colby, Sarah; White, Adrienne; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Kattelmann, Kendra; Franzen-Castle, Lisa D.; Brown, Onikia; Kidd, Tandalayo; Shelnutt, Karla P.; Horacek, Tanya; Greene, Geoffrey W.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McNamara, J, Olfert, MD, Sowers, M, Colby, S, White, A, Byrd-Bredbenner, C, Kattelmann, K, Franzen-Castle, LD, Brown, O, Kidd, T, Shelnutt, KP, Horacek, T & Greene, GW 2019, 'Development of an Instrument Measuring Perceived Environmental Healthfulness: Behavior Environment Perception Survey (BEPS)', Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2019.09.003
McNamara, Jade ; Olfert, Melissa D. ; Sowers, Morgan ; Colby, Sarah ; White, Adrienne ; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol ; Kattelmann, Kendra ; Franzen-Castle, Lisa D. ; Brown, Onikia ; Kidd, Tandalayo ; Shelnutt, Karla P. ; Horacek, Tanya ; Greene, Geoffrey W. / Development of an Instrument Measuring Perceived Environmental Healthfulness : Behavior Environment Perception Survey (BEPS). In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2019.
@article{6f353a1f5f7144c5b4ca9c01dfc435af,
title = "Development of an Instrument Measuring Perceived Environmental Healthfulness: Behavior Environment Perception Survey (BEPS)",
abstract = "Objective: To create a tool to measure college students’ perception of the healthfulness of their environment. Design: (1) Item generation, (2) cognitive interview testing and exploratory factor analysis, (3) item refinement/modification, (4) factor structure validation, and (5) criterion validation. Setting: Ten college campuses. Participants: Time point 1 (n = 120 cognitive interviews; n = 922 factor analysis); time point 2 (n = 2,676), convenience sample of undergraduate students. Main Outcome Measures: Cognitive interviews and survey data were used to assess perceptions about the environment. Analysis: Exploratory factor analysis, structural equation confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regressions. Results: Item generation resulted in 93 items. Items were eliminated based on cognitive interviews, exploratory factor analysis of pilot data, and elimination of cross-loading or weak loading items. In confirmatory analyses, a 21-item, 5-factor structure was the best fit for the data (χ2 = 3,286.77, degrees of freedom = 189; comparative fit index = 0.840; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.078). Environmental factors include physical activity (α = 0.68, 4 items), healthful eating (α = 0.86, 5 items), mental health (α = 0.85, 5 items), barriers to healthful eating (α = 0.70, 4 items), and peer influences (α = 0.73, 3 items). There were significant associations between scales and validation criteria (P < .05). Conclusions and Implications: The Behavior Environment Perception Survey is a novel instrument measuring perceptions of the healthfulness of the campus environment. Strengths include a development process involving 10 different universities, strong psychometric properties, and breadth of constructs.",
keywords = "environment, health behavior, perception, survey methodology, young adult",
author = "Jade McNamara and Olfert, {Melissa D.} and Morgan Sowers and Sarah Colby and Adrienne White and Carol Byrd-Bredbenner and Kendra Kattelmann and Franzen-Castle, {Lisa D.} and Onikia Brown and Tandalayo Kidd and Shelnutt, {Karla P.} and Tanya Horacek and Greene, {Geoffrey W.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jneb.2019.09.003",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior",
issn = "1499-4046",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development of an Instrument Measuring Perceived Environmental Healthfulness

T2 - Behavior Environment Perception Survey (BEPS)

AU - McNamara, Jade

AU - Olfert, Melissa D.

AU - Sowers, Morgan

AU - Colby, Sarah

AU - White, Adrienne

AU - Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

AU - Kattelmann, Kendra

AU - Franzen-Castle, Lisa D.

AU - Brown, Onikia

AU - Kidd, Tandalayo

AU - Shelnutt, Karla P.

AU - Horacek, Tanya

AU - Greene, Geoffrey W.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: To create a tool to measure college students’ perception of the healthfulness of their environment. Design: (1) Item generation, (2) cognitive interview testing and exploratory factor analysis, (3) item refinement/modification, (4) factor structure validation, and (5) criterion validation. Setting: Ten college campuses. Participants: Time point 1 (n = 120 cognitive interviews; n = 922 factor analysis); time point 2 (n = 2,676), convenience sample of undergraduate students. Main Outcome Measures: Cognitive interviews and survey data were used to assess perceptions about the environment. Analysis: Exploratory factor analysis, structural equation confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regressions. Results: Item generation resulted in 93 items. Items were eliminated based on cognitive interviews, exploratory factor analysis of pilot data, and elimination of cross-loading or weak loading items. In confirmatory analyses, a 21-item, 5-factor structure was the best fit for the data (χ2 = 3,286.77, degrees of freedom = 189; comparative fit index = 0.840; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.078). Environmental factors include physical activity (α = 0.68, 4 items), healthful eating (α = 0.86, 5 items), mental health (α = 0.85, 5 items), barriers to healthful eating (α = 0.70, 4 items), and peer influences (α = 0.73, 3 items). There were significant associations between scales and validation criteria (P < .05). Conclusions and Implications: The Behavior Environment Perception Survey is a novel instrument measuring perceptions of the healthfulness of the campus environment. Strengths include a development process involving 10 different universities, strong psychometric properties, and breadth of constructs.

AB - Objective: To create a tool to measure college students’ perception of the healthfulness of their environment. Design: (1) Item generation, (2) cognitive interview testing and exploratory factor analysis, (3) item refinement/modification, (4) factor structure validation, and (5) criterion validation. Setting: Ten college campuses. Participants: Time point 1 (n = 120 cognitive interviews; n = 922 factor analysis); time point 2 (n = 2,676), convenience sample of undergraduate students. Main Outcome Measures: Cognitive interviews and survey data were used to assess perceptions about the environment. Analysis: Exploratory factor analysis, structural equation confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regressions. Results: Item generation resulted in 93 items. Items were eliminated based on cognitive interviews, exploratory factor analysis of pilot data, and elimination of cross-loading or weak loading items. In confirmatory analyses, a 21-item, 5-factor structure was the best fit for the data (χ2 = 3,286.77, degrees of freedom = 189; comparative fit index = 0.840; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.078). Environmental factors include physical activity (α = 0.68, 4 items), healthful eating (α = 0.86, 5 items), mental health (α = 0.85, 5 items), barriers to healthful eating (α = 0.70, 4 items), and peer influences (α = 0.73, 3 items). There were significant associations between scales and validation criteria (P < .05). Conclusions and Implications: The Behavior Environment Perception Survey is a novel instrument measuring perceptions of the healthfulness of the campus environment. Strengths include a development process involving 10 different universities, strong psychometric properties, and breadth of constructs.

KW - environment, health behavior

KW - perception

KW - survey methodology

KW - young adult

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85073933460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85073933460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jneb.2019.09.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jneb.2019.09.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 31648882

AN - SCOPUS:85073933460

JO - Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

JF - Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

SN - 1499-4046

ER -